生活无聊透了

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<HTML>这儿的生活简直无聊透了!</HTML>
 

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<HTML>There are a lot of Museums in Ottawa. Some are pretty good.
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<HTML>What kind of thing do you want to play? Let me see if we can team up.

Are you single or not? I am single.</HTML>
 

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<HTML>I don't know. Just sometimes I feel really bored, going to movies, fishing, camping, dining with friends just help at the time, after all, the problem is from inside.</HTML>
 

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<HTML>Hi,Fun-seeker, Could you introduce some information about Museums in Ottawa?</HTML>
 

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<HTML>Canadian Museum of Civilization
100 Laurier St., 776-7000, http://www.civilization.ca
A breathtaking architectural achievement. The building's design recalls the Ice Age, when wind, sea and glaciers moulded the land. Inside, visitors are taken on a celebratory tour of First Peoples' culture and Canada's past. The building also houses two smaller museums, the Canadian Children's Museum, and the Canadian Postal Museum, as well as an IMAX theatre. The Museum of Civilization is the country's largest and most visited museum.
Hours: May 1 to June 30: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., open Thursdays till 9 p.m. (Children's Museum till 7 p.m.) July 1 to Sept. 3: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursdays and Fridays till 9 p.m.
Admission: Adults: $8 museum, $8.50 IMAX, $14 for both. Youth (13-17): $6 museum, $7 IMAX, $11 both. Seniors (65+): $7 museum, $7 IMAX, $12 both. Children (2-12): $4 museum, $6 IMAX, $9 both. Families (max. 5): $20. Musuem admission free on Thursdays, 4 p.m. to 9 p.m., half-price on Sundays. Call ahead for group rates.
Tours: Guided tours of permanent or special exhibitions cost $2.50 ($4 for two exhibitions); they're offered daily at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Audio guides are also available for some exhibitions.
Major Attractions
Permanent exhibitions: The Grand Hall is the centrepiece of the museum. Learn about the people of British Columbia's north coast -- the Haida, Tsimshian, Tlingit and Nisga'a. Or trace the history of the Coast Salish, the largest First Nations group in B.C. The hall is marked by several stunning totem poles and six Pacific Coast Indian house facades and a forest backer Pierre Huot tells stories about the music of the world's French-speaking countries, 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. Aug.19: Traditional Vietnamese music with the group DucThanh Pham, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Facilities: Gift shop with wide selection of artwork, books, souvenirs and crafts. Cafeteria and coffee shop. Four-star French restaurant overlooking Ottawa River. Wheelchair-accessible. Underground pay parking.
Fast facts: The Canadian Museum of Civilization has the world's largest indoor collection of totem poles.
The Grand Hall was built in the shape of an enormous canoe. Architect Douglas Cardinal was inspired by a native myth about the raven's magic canoe, which could shrink to the size of a pine needle or expand to hold the entire universe.
One of the most expensive objects in the national collection is Champlain's astrolabe, acquired from the New York Historical Society in 1989 for $250,000.
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National Gallery of Canada
380 Sussex Drive, 990-1985
http://national.gallery.ca
This striking granite and glass museum overlooking the Ottawa River is home to 45,000 works by Canadian and international artists, with some 1,200 works on display at any given time. The museum strives to appeal to a range of tastes and to make itself accessible to all ages through lectures, workshops, tours and concerts.
Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursdays till 8 p.m.
Admission: Permanent Collection: Free. Gustav Klimt summer exhibition (advance purchase recommended; tickets are for a specific date and time): Adults: $12. Seniors and students: $10. Youth (12-19): $5. Families (max. 2 adults, 3 children): $24. Children under 12: Free, but timed ticket required. Call ahead for group rates.
Tours: Guided tours of permanent collection are free, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m daily. Audio guides also available. Tours of Klimt exhibition cost $6, offered daily at 9:10 a.m., Wed. at 6 p.m.; advance purchase recommended. Audio guides $5.
Major Attractions
Permanent exhibitions: Among the Canadian artists represented in the Canadian Collection: Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven, Emily Carr, Alfred Pellan, Elizabeth Wyn Wood, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Frances Loring, Michael Snow, Guido Molinari, Ozias Leduc, Jack Shadbolt, L.L. FitzGerald, Jean Paul Lemieux. There are also galleries devoted to European, American and Inuit art, as well as a gallery showcasing contemporary art in all its forms: paintings, sculpture, film, multimedia and more.
Special exhibitions: Gustav Klimt (1862-1918): Modernism in the Making: This exhibition brings together some 34 paintings, 87 drawings and 20 historical photographs lent by museums and private collections in Europe, North America and Japan. See how Klimt captured the spirit and mood of fin-de-siecle Vienna, then in its cultural heyday. The exhibition features a selection of both early and later works, including portraits, history paintings and landscapes. It is the first retrospective of the artist's work to be held in North America. Until Sept. 16 (See story on page C6). Forty-Part Motet: Artist Janet Cardiff recorded the voices of 40 choir members separately; these are played through 40 speakers arranged around the museum's Rideau Chapel. This popular ongoing exhibit has been extended until the end of summer. Ousmane Sow: Twenty-three monumental sculptures of members of various ethnic groups native to Africa by the internationally renowned Senegalese artist, June 24 to Sept. 9. The Games of La Francophonie: Painting and Photography Contests, July 14-24. The Engraved Passion of Durer: Until July 15. Peter Doig: Nine large-scale paintings from the British artist, Aug. 17 to Oct. 28. Kiakshuk: Images by a Hunter-Artist: Until Oct. 28.
Summer highlights: June 21: Klimt-inspired program of piano music, Beethoven to Schoenberg, 7 p.m.
June 23: Klimt Fashion Show by the students of Richard Robinson's Academy of Fashion Design, 2 p.m. June 24: Ousmane Sow will talk about his work. In French with simultaneous translation, 1 p.m. July 15, 29 and Aug. 12: Art conservator Wendy Baker and artist Roumen Kirinkov will demonstrate Gustav Klimt's technique, showing the development from drawing to finished painting, and the use of gold leaf, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 18: Peter Doig will talk about his exhibition. 1 p.m. Aug. 19: Lecture titled Cosmos and Psyche: Klimt, Mahler, and the Artists of the Kunstschau, 2 p.m. July and August: Children's day camps for ages 6 to 12. Information and registration: 998-8888.
Facilities: Library with more than 200,000 books, periodicals and catalogues, as well as 350,000 photographs and 180,000 slides. Gift shop offering a wide selection of art books, as well as jewelry, glassware and art reproductions. Self-serve cafeteria. Sit-down cafe offering light lunches and pastries. Wheelchair-accessible. Underground pay parking.
Fast facts: At the heart of the Canadian Galleries is the reconstructed 19th-century chapel that was formerly part of the Rideau Street Convent, a girls' school that opened in 1845, and was demolished in 1972.
Voice of Fire, the controversial 18-foot painting by Barnett Newman which dominates the gallery dedicated to American Expressionism, was first exhibited at Expo '67 in Montreal.
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Canadian Museum of Nature
240 MacLeod St., 566-4700
http://nature.ca
As you walk through the front doors of the castle-like Victoria Memorial Museum building, prepare to come face-to-face with a replica of the fearsome, 70-million year-old Daspletosaurus torosus, a dinosaur that once lived in what is now Alberta. The stone heritage building boasts one of the world's largest natural history collections, covering four billion years of Earth history.
Hours: 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursdays till 8 p.m.
Admission: Adults: $6. Seniors and students (13+): $5. Children (3-12): $2.50. Children under 3: Free. Families: $13. Free on Thursdays, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Call ahead for group rates and tours.
Major Attractions
Permanent exhibitions: Kids will get a kick out of the Creepy Critters gallery showcasing a variety of live insects, rodents and reptiles. The Finders and Keepers exhibit includes more than 400 specimens, from the enormous (such as a giraffe skeleton) to the microscopic (fleas and lice). Learn why the barren-ground caribou is so sure-footed in the snow in the Mammals in Canada gallery, where dioramas capture a moment in the life of Canada's mammals. Test your bird-identifying skills and find out more about seasonal migration patterns in the Birds in Canada gallery. The Animals in Nature gallery shows how pollutants have caused a decline in the number of predatory species such as the peregrine falcon. See how bees make honey or find out why Japanese companies are pumping the fresh scent of lemons into the workplace in the Plant Life and Nature's Pharmacy exhibits. Take an elevator ride beneath the surface of the Earth to visit a gold mine, and find out why gold is so valuable in the Mineral Gallery, where you can also board a time machine that will take you back to the origins of Earth and the forces that have shaped it. See a new replica of the chasmosaur or go digging for dinosaur fossils in the Life through the Ages gallery.
Special exhibitions: How would you fare in a race against an ostrich or cheetah? Visitors can test their speed and strength against other animals in the Animal Athletes exhibition, which shows how animals have adapted physically to their environments. Until September. Diving with the Great Whales plays daily in the museum's high-definition cinema. English version, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.; in French at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Until Sept. 3.
Summer highlights: June 30 to Sept. 3: Interpretative stations around the museum will help visitors understand the secrets of whales, how scientists build models of dinosaurs and identify groups of insects. July 1: Canada Day. Free admission. July: Museum science specialist will be available to answer questions at the Exploration Station, Mon. to Fri. July and August: Day camps for children aged 6 to 12. Information: 566-4701.
Facilities: Gift shop sells everything from B.C. jade to petrified wood, jewelry to stuffed toys and souvenirs. Cafe with light meals and snacks. Wheelchair-accessible. Pay parking.
Fast facts: The building served as the federal government's second home from 1916 to 1920 after fire destroyed the Parliament Buildings on the Hill.
Eons ago, beavers were once as big as black bears. The museum has skeleton remains of a giant beaver, the ancestor of Canada's national symbol.
The ghost of Sir Wilfrid Laurier is said to haunt the upper floors of the museum.
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Canada Science and Technology Museum
1867 St. Laurent Blvd., 991-3044
www.science-tech.nmstc.ca
Did you know that if the energy stored in a jar of peanut butter were transformed into oil or electricity, it could heat a house for several hours or drive a car 10 kilometres at high speed? That's just one of the many things you'll discover here. A lighthouse, a locomotive and rocket are planted in the Technology Park in front of the museum, which is impossible to miss. Once inside, visitors can explore several exhibitions. There are plenty of interactive and hands-on activities.
Hours: Daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Admission: Adults: $6. Students and Seniors: $5. Children (6-14): $2. Under 6: Free. Family (max. 2 adults, 2 children): $12. Free admission during the last hour. Call ahead for group rates and tours .
Major Attractions
Permanent exhibitions: Love, Leisure and Laundry explores the evolution of household technology. Canada In Space explores this country's scientific and technical feats in the space program. Includes a full-scale model of the Canadarm. Visitors can climb aboard steam locomotives in the Locomotive Hall. From telephones to radio to the Internet, Connexions explores all facets of communications technology and their impact on our lives. Beautiful antique cars are showcased in the More than a Machine exhibition, featuring vehicles from the 1900s to the 1930s. Includes a 1926 Toronto Tramways double-decker bus. The Canadian Science and Engineering Hall of Fame celebrates the achievements of people such as Sir Sandford Fleming, Joseph-Armand Bombardier and others. See if you can keep your balance in the Crazy Kitchen.
Special exhibitions: The Eye Spy exhibition examines the world of espionage and covert photography. Until September. Learn how the four fundamental classes of materials -- ceramics, metals, polymers and composites -- are processed for use in the Materials exhibition. Until October. Canoes: The Shape of Success traces the evolution of this national icon. Until October, 2002.
Summer highlights: July 1: Canada Day. Free admission and behind-the-scenes tours of warehouses. July 1 to Sept. 3: Rides on the Shay locomotive, Wednesdays and Sundays. July 2 to Aug. 17: Day camps for children aged 6 to 12. Call 991-3044 for info or 991-3053 to register. July 8: Evolution of Wheels. Cars of all makes on display in Technology Park. Tours of the museum's vehicle warehouse. Aug. 18: Family Fun Day. Free admission. Many outdoor activities, including scavenger hunt, water rocket launch, and bubble race.
Facilities: Science Information Centre provides resources to students and teachers on a range of topics. Live stage demonstrations. Gift shop sells science-related toys, puzzles and games. Research library houses more than 17,000 monograph titles, 300 current periodical subscriptions and more than 20,000 items of trade literature. Cafeteria with light meals and snacks. Wheelchair-accessible. Free parking.
Fast facts: A Canadian, Reginald Fessenden, invented voice radio.
The museum's observatory houses the largest refracting telescope in Canada.
The first documented Canadian automobile was constructed in Stanstead, Que., in 1866-67 by Henry Seth Taylor.
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Canadian War Museum
330 Sussex Drive, 776-8600
http://www.warmuseum.ca
A life-sized diorama of a typical First World War trench and the Mercedes Benz used by Adolph Hitler are just two of the exhibits showcased here. The museum has the largest military collection in Canada, with more than 500,000 artifacts, including medals, uniforms, tanks and other vehicles, and works of art.
Hours: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Thursdays till 8 p.m.
Admission: Adults: $4. Seniors (65+): $3. Students: $3. Children (2-12): $2. Family (max. 5): $9. Free Thursdays, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Half-price Sundays. Call ahead for group rates and tours.
Major Attractions
Permanent exhibitions: Canada's war history, from New France to the First and Second World Wars to modern-day peacekeeping missions, are documented on three floors. The museum's newest exhibit explores Canada's contribution to NATO. It chronicles everything from the return of Canadian troops to Germany in 1951 to our participation in NATO missions in the Balkans nearly 50 years later. The Hall of Honour celebrates the valour and heroism of more than 40 Canadians.
Special exhibitions: The Art of Peacemaking: The Gun Sculpture brings home the price of human conflict. The sculpture consists of 7,000 de-activated weapons donated by police forces, military groups and communities from around the world, welded together to evoke a prison cell or tomb. A mural with the photos, names and descriptions of victims of violence, and a blackboard for visitors' comments. Until June 24. Canadian Forces personnel will be on hand to talk about equipment and share their experiences in the outdoor exhibit Past and Present: Military Equipment from the Canadian War Museum and the Canadian Forces, June 29 to Aug. 31. Kiska Sketches: War Art by E.J. Hughes, 1943 consists of 16 small impressionist oil paintings by the Second World War artist. The paintings depict the 13th Canadian Infantry Brigade in the Aleutian Islands. Until Oct. 21. Truth, Duty, Valour: The Royal Military College of Canada, 1876-2000 celebrates the 125-year history of Canada's only military university. Until Oct. 28. The personal stories from Canada's first overseas force are documented in Imperial Adventure: Canadians in the South African War, 1899-1902. Until November, 2002. Off-site: Open House at Vimy House: Features a treasure trove of artifacts from cannons to a modern Chieftain tank. One ticket buys admission to the War Museum and Vimy House at 221 Champagne Ave. N. June 23 to Sept. 3. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Summer highlights: June 29 to Aug. 31: Free noon-hour concerts every Friday in the courtyard, featuring ensembles from the Central Band of the Canadian Forces. July 1: Canada Day. Free admission. Concert by the Central Band of the Canadian Forces, 11 a.m.
Facilities: Library with extensive collection of books and periodicals covering Canadian military history; call 776-8652 for appointment. Gift shop offers books, puzzles and souvenirs. Cafe with light meals and snacks. Wheelchair access. Limited parking (pay parking available at the National Gallery).
Fast facts: During the Second World War, Canada recruited more than one million men and women out of a population of only 12 million.
Lieut. Alexander Dunn was the first Canadian to receive the British Empire's highest award for bravery, the Victoria Cross, for his part in the Battle at Balaclava during the Crimean War.
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Canada Aviation Museum
11 Aviation Parkway, 993-2010
http://www.aviation.nmstc.ca
Take a stroll down the Walkway of Time in this massive building, which houses one of the world's best collections of vintage aircraft. In addition to getting an up-close look at aircraft from different eras, visitors will hear some remarkable tales, from the adventures of Canadian bush pilots to the controversy surrounding the Avro Arrow project to the contributions made by women in wartime.
Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursdays till 9 p.m.
Admission: Adults: $6. Students and seniors: $4. Children (6-15): $2. Under 6: Free. Family: $12. Free on Thursdays, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Call ahead for group rates.
Tours: Daily 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m., 3:45 p.m.
Major Attractions
Permanent exhibitions: The museum boasts a huge collection of vintage aircraft including: a full-scale replica of the Silver Dart (1909), the first powered aircraft to take flight in Canada; the Supermarine Spitfire, one of the most famous British fighters of the Second World War; the Lockheed 10A Electra, the type of plane flown by Amelia Earhart during her attempted round-the-world flight in the 1930s. Sit at the controls of a Cessna, 10 a.m., 1 p.m., 3:15 p.m. Wind-tunnel demonstrations, 10:30 a.m.
Special exhibitions: Wind in the Wires: A Scrapbook of Aviation in Canada 1909-1914: Dedicated to the early days of flight in Canada before the First World War. Opens June 28.
Summer highlights: July 1: Canada "Open Cockpit" Day. Free admission. The Skyhawks, Canada's premier parachute team, will be on hand, as will the Snowbirds. Crafts and music for the children. July and August: Day camps for children aged 8 to 14. Includes a plane ride. Call for more info. Throughout summer: Go on an actual flight on board a historical, open-cockpit, Stearman biplane, or a de Havilland Canada Chipmunk. Cost varies per aircraft.
Facilities: Research library with more than 10,000 books related to the history of aviation. Gift shop with scale models, posters, puzzles and books. Cafe offers light meals and snacks. Wheelchair-accessible. Free parking.
Fast facts: In 1949, the government cancelled the Avro Arrow program, Canada's venture into interceptor jet production. The Defence Department ordered the jets destroyed; the few remaining remnants -- a nose section, two wing tips and the famous Orenda engine -- are housed in the museum.
Canada's first bush plane, La Vigilance, was recovered by the museum 45 years after it crashed in Lake Ontario.
The first stewardesses had to be trained nurses.
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Canada Agriculture Museum
Prince of Wales Drive and Experimental Farm Drive, 991-3044 http://www.agriculture.nmstc.ca
Learn how grain is made into flour and bread, or help collect chicken eggs in the Poultry House. With cows, pigs, sheep, horses, chickens and rabbits, the Agriculture Museum is a working farm that celebrates Canada's agricultural heritage, located on the grounds of the Central Experimental Farm.
Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Admission: Adults: $5. Youth (16-21): $4. Seniors (60+): $4. Children (3-15): $3. Families (max. 2 adults, 3 children): $12. Call ahead for group rates and tours.
Major Attractions
Bread: The Inside Story: Learn how wheat is grown, harvested and made into bread. Daily breadmaking demonstrations until Aug. 31. Travel back to the start of the last century and see A Barn of the 1920s. See the chickens at the Poultry House, or tour the Rare Breeds Barn to see some of the rarest livestock breeds. Cows are milked at the on-site dairy each day at 4 p.m. Meet Rosanne, the Limousin heifer that survived a 1996 barn fire which killed many of the farm's beef cattle.
Summer highlights: June 17: Father's Day. Tractor demonstrations, obstacle course races, breadmaking and games. June 24 to July 24: Breads of the Francophone World. Collect recipes and tips from bakers. July 1: Canada Day. Free admission. Games, crafts and ice-cream making. Aug. 4-6: Ice Cream Festival. Learn how to make frozen treats. July 2 to Aug. 24: Day camps for children aged 4 to 14. Call 991-3053 for info and to register. Sept. 1-3: An equine extravaganza. See different breeds of horses, ponies and donkeys.
Facilities: Gift shop sells farm-related souvenirs and top-quality seeds. Wheelchair-accessible. Free parking.
Fast facts: The Arcott, a breed of sheep on show at the museum, frequently produce triplets. Last year, one ewe gave birth to quadruplets.
*A century ago, a farmer could produce enough food to feed seven to 10 people; today, due to more efficient production methods, a farmer can feed 90 or more.
Each year, Canadians consume about 51 pounds of beef per person.
A laying hen produces about 270 eggs on average per year.
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Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography
1 Rideau Canal (next to Chateau Laurier)
990-8257, http://cmcp.gallery.ca
Modern Canadian history and culture as seen through the lens. The collection spans from the 1960s to the present and consists of more than 160,000 works. The museum, affiliated with the National Gallery, is housed in a reconstructed railway tunnel.
Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursdays till 8 p.m.
Admission: Free
Tours: Sun. 12 p.m. (English), 2 p.m. (French). Call ahead for group tours.
Major attractions: Taking in Colour: Technique in Colour Photography: Until July 4. Larry Towell: Works 1985-2000: Eighty works on El Salvador, Palestine and migrant Mennonite workers by this internationally renowned photo-journalist. Until July 8. Diana Thorneycroft: The Body, its lesson and camouflage: Dark, dreamlike photographs explore sexuality, memory and the forces that shape our identity. Until July 8. The Games of La Francophonie Contest: July 14-24. Peter Pitseolak: Inuit photographer recorded 1940s life in Cape Dorset. July 9 to Sept. 30. Peter Boogaerts: Aug. 3 to Jan. 6, 2002.
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Currency Museum of the Bank of Canada
245 Sparks St., 782-8914
http://www.currencymuseum.ca
Before coins and paper money became the coin of the realm, shells, teeth and cocoa beans were used. Trace the evolution of the world's money over 2,500 years. The museum has the most complete collection of Canadian bank notes, coins and tokens in the world.
Hours: Mon. to Sat., 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sun., 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Admission: Free
Tours: July 2 to Labour Day: Daily tours 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. (English); 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. (French); afternoon tours only on Sundays. Call ahead for group tours.
Major attractions: The Colour of Your Money explores the history, production, design and future of Canadian bank notes, with an emphasis on the new bank note series. Until Oct. 7.
Summer highlights: July 1: Canada Day. Massive treasure hunt in conjunction with the National Archives, National Library, Supreme Court and Elections Canada. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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The Billings Estate Museum
2100 Cabot St., 247-4830
Once home to Braddish and Lamira Billings, two of Ottawa's founding settlers, the Billings house is one of the city's oldest, dating back to the 1820s.
Hours: Tues to Sun., noon to 5 p.m.
Admission: Adults: $2.50. Seniors: $2. Children/Youth (5-17): $1.50. Under 5: free.
Tours: Guided tours available on request. Call ahead for group tours.
Major attractions: Family heirlooms, personal belongings, furniture, tools and paintings spanning five generations have been carefully preserved. This heritage site stretches across eight acres of parkland and includes several outbuildings and a cemetery.
Summer highlights: June 17: Antique car show, noon to 4 p.m. July 8, 15, 22, 29: Master gardeners will be offering advice during Tea on the Lawn, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. July 15: Heritage trades fair. Blacksmiths, quilters, cooks and others will demonstrate their crafts, and sell items. Aug. 6: Special historical tours will be offered; tea will be served on the lawn. Sept. 2: Local artists will display their work. Daily (except Mondays and Saturdays): Tea will be served under a large striped marquee in the gardens. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
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Bytown Museum
1 Canal Lane (access off Wellington)
234-4570, http://ncf.ca/bytownmuseum
Housed in Ottawa's oldest stone building, the 170-year-old museum tells the story of Lt.-Col. John By, the construction of the Rideau Canal, and the early years of Ottawa.
Hours: Mon. to Fri., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; closed Tuesdays. Sat., noon to 4 p.m. Sun., 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Admission: Adults: $5. Youth /Seniors: $2.50. Family: $12. Call ahead for group rates and tours.
Major attractions: From Their Hands: From Simple to Elegant: Exhibit traces the evolution of furniture styles and elements, offering comparison between simple, hand-crafted styles and elegant pieces.
Summer highlights: June 21: Seminar on the identification of furniture styles. Pre-register. July 13: Friday the 13th -- Haunted Moments. Presented in conjunction with Haunted Walk of Ottawa. Pre-register. July 19: Lecture on the care and conservation of furniture. Pre-register. Aug. 6: Colonel By Day.
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Diefenbunker: Canada's Cold War Museum
3911 Carp Rd., Carp, Ont., 839-0007, www.diefenbunker.ca
For 33 years, the secret bunker served as Canada's Central Emergency Government Headquarters. In the event of a nuclear attack, the bunker could house more than 500 government leaders, public servants and military personnel. It was designed to resist a five-megaton nuclear weapon detonated 1.8 kilometres away.
Admission: Adults: $12. Seniors (65+): $10. Students: $10. Children (6-17): $5. Under 6: free. Call ahead for group rates.
Tours (mandatory): Until June 30: Mon. to Fri. 2 p.m., Sat. and Sun. 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. July 1 to Sept. 3: Daily 11 a.m., noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m. (French version at 1 p.m.)
Major attractions: Some of the special areas visitors will see include: the Emergency Government Situation Centre, the War Cabinet Room, the CBC Radio Studio, the Bank of Canada vault, the Prime Minister's Suite and a mockup of a basement fallout shelter. There's also a photo exhibit by the Atomic Photographers Guild titled Visibility and Invisibility in the Nuclear Era. June 30 to Sept. 30.
Summer highlights: June 26: Lecture by Paul Ozorak titled Bunkers in Britain, 7 p.m. Call ahead to reserve. June 30: Third Anniversary Celebration. Music, BBQ, sales, tours.

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<HTML>Hi,Fun-seeker, Could you please tell me which one is the most interesting?
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Good museums

<HTML>Civilization M. is good. You can watch the IMAX movies. You can even see Parliement Hill from Hull.
Science & tech M. is good.
Nature M. is good.
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why not...

<HTML>1. get a dream. be a millonaire or something like that. that will keep you busy and forget about the boring life.
2. go to the gym. use up all your energy and be so tired that you won't feel anything. actually, after excersize, you'll feel better. </HTML>
 

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RE: why not...

<HTML>1. I have dream - I will leave the city and such boring life.
2. I go to gym too. It is up to the work.

However, I think ddd may need a nice girl friend. At least, I am. :)</HTML>
 
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