前一阵在Algonquin Park翻船淹死/冻死的事件,第一手详细描叙来了

gocanoeing

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Algonquin Park was in its peak autumn glory on Thanksgiving weekend Saturday as Glenn Wallace and his wife, Krista Petrie-Wallace, and another family launched sea kayaks into Opeongo Lake on the start of a three-day wilderness getaway.

It was warm, just shy of 20 C, but a brisk 25 km/h wind whipped down the lake from the northwest.

Petrie-Wallace was first to spot the overturned canoe. The couple and one other young paddler were halfway up the 14-kilometre-long lake, near the centre of the “Y” and a few hundred metres behind the rest of their group. Wallace turned to investigate while Petrie-Wallace continued on to accompany the less-experienced paddler on the rough water.

Wallace dug his paddle blades deep and closed the kilometre distance to the accident scene in just minutes.

He found two men and a woman in the water alongside the overturned canoe. Two other canoes, each with three people in them, were trying to help, but the conditions were poor and the other paddlers were inexperienced. Wallace recognized the makings of a potential catastrophe.

“Opeongo Lake is known for having nasty weather at times, and it was living up to its billing,” he said.

“I realized very quickly that, given the combination of the cold water and the inability of the group to enact a self-rescue, it was going to be a life-and-death situation very quickly”

He knew it would be up to him to devise a plan and carry it out.

Despite a language barrier, Wallace was able to direct the other canoes to shore, about 200 metres away, and told them to start a fire.

The weakest swimmer of the three individuals in the water was the woman, so Wallace had her hold on to his kayak as he aimed for shore. It took 20 minutes of hard paddling to get there, into the wind and with her weight dragging behind him. As soon as she was safe, Wallace turned and went back onto the lake. The wind was blowing harder, carrying the two remaining swimmers farther from shore.

Two of the other canoeists paddled back to the scene to try to help, but couldn’t manage well in the worsening conditions and were soon blown clear across the bay to the far shore. Wallace was on his own.

The second person in the water was a better swimmer and kicked his legs as Wallace paddled toward shore a second time. By the time Wallace dropped him off and turned around, the third swimmer, Lin, had been in the water for more than an hour.

The waves were up to four feet high. Weak, cold and exhausted, Lin could barely cling to the kayak as Wallace turned for shore once more. Weighted down and battling the increasing wind, Wallace made little headway. He turned around and tried paddling with the wind at his back for the opposite shore. But it was hopeless.

“I knew at that point that, if there was going to be a successful rescue, I’d have to get a power boat to do it,” he said. “In order to do that, I had to leave him. That was a hard decision. But I knew, if I didn’t leave, the odds of a successful rescue would be basically zero.”

Leaving Lin in the water, Wallace started south as fast as he could on the seven-kilometre paddle back to the dock. He passed a couple camped on an island and stopped just long enough to get them to call for help, which they did using a satellite-based emergency beacon. It was 4:20 p.m. and that call was the first alert to police and paramedics of the disaster.

Wallace set off again and within a few minutes encountered one of the powerful water taxis operated by Algonquin Outfitters. He told the operators what had happened and the water taxi took off at high speed toward the accident scene, radioing for a second water taxi to join the search. Wallace followed in his kayak, arriving about 20 minutes later.

It took more searching to again find Lin, his black jacket and dark blue personal flotation device blending in with the waves. Limp and unresponsive, he was brought aboard the water taxi, and, joined by Wallace, they set off at top speed for the dock. It took just 10 minutes to get there, but the ride was so rough that it was impossible to begin first aid. Wallace never learned the names of the young men driving the boats, but called their actions “exemplary.”

After the water taxi arrived at the dock, others there began CPR. An ambulance arrived almost immediately. But it was too late. Lin was pronounced dead in hospital.

Power boats were dispatched to pick up the remaining stranded canoeists, who were brought back safely. All of them, including Lin, had been wearing personal flotation devices, which probably prevented an even greater tragedy.

“That was very important,” Wallace said. “I don’t want to say it was a successful rescue because we weren’t able to save everyone, but, for my ability to get the first two people out, that was important.”

A PFD can only buy time, though. It can’t save an individual from the inevitable hypothermia that follows cold-water immersion. Despite the warm air temperature, the water of Opeongo Lake that day was dangerously cold.

“Cold water kills. We’re very quick to forget that in Canada,” Wallace said. “Our boating season basically corresponds to hypothermia season. If you’re on the water in the spring or the fall — it doesn’t matter what you’re doing, whether you’re canoeing or in a duck blind or power boating with your friends — if you end up in the water for a significant period of time, your life could be at risk.”

In addition, Lin’s black jacket and dark PFD made him hard to spot in the water. Bright clothing, a yellow jacket or red hat, would have made it easier for rescuers to see him, Wallace said.

In the end, going into the wilderness carries risk and it’s up to people to understand and manage that risk, he said.

“It’s a reminder to people how quickly what was supposed to be a pleasant adventure into the outdoors can turn tragic. I would never want to discourage anyone from doing it, but you need to be aware of the real and significant risks we run when we do these things.”

Lin’s death weighs heavily on Wallace, but he says he’s proud of what he did.

“All that anyone can ask is that you do your best. That’s going to look different for everyone. But, if you do everything you can, there’s not really anything anyone can ask of you.”

 

gocanoeing

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Another description:

OPEONGO LAKE RESCUE OCTOBER 10TH, 2020

13/10/2020

My husband Glenn Wallace and I were involved in a canoe rescue on Opeongo Lake in Algonquin Provincial Park on October 10th, 2020.
...

My husband's account:

On Saturday I was involved in an incident that I believe should be shared as a learning experience for all. Krista Petrie-Wallace and I were planning to spend a relaxing Thanksgiving weekend camping in Algonquin Park with Rodney Wilson and family. We were to sea kayak into the East Arm of Opeongo Lake and enjoy a three day excursion into the Park.

We launched at the Opeongo Lake access point/Algonquin Outfitters location in early afternoon and had paddled uneventfully to the head of the South Arm. We then began to work our way across the most exposed section of the lake, where all three “arms” converge.

Opeongo Lake is the largest in the Park and has a reputation for rough waters in windy conditions. The wind (from the W/NW) was a steady 25 km/h with gusts that were significantly higher. Once in the exposed area of the lake our group broke into two groups. Krista and I were with the youngest member of our group and trailed the first three members of our group by a few hundred meters.
About 2:20 PM Krista commented that she thought she saw an overturned canoe and two upright canoes in the distance to our east. It was difficult to tell with the distance and 2 foot wind swell. After a quick conversation it was agreed she would continue on with the young paddler and I would break off to investigate. Little did I realize this would be the start of a 2.5 hour stretch of nearly constant maximal paddling effort for me.

The three canoes were about 1 km from our location, near the entrance to Jones Bay. Paddling hard I covered the distance in minutes and approached the scene. As I closed the distance I could see 6 people in two upright canoes and 3 people swimming alongside the third canoe.

Upon arriving to the group I immediately could see a catastrophe was unfolding. My instant assessment revealed:
a) none of the three people in the water could swim with any competence, although they (and all in the group) were wearing PFDs.
b) none of the three people in the water were dressed for cold water immersion
c) none of the 9 people involved had the skills to affect a rescue
d) language barrier was a very real issue
e) there were no other people, boats, etc. anywhere near to help me
I knew that if the three people were not pulled from the water in a timely fashion they would all die. At this point the shore was about 200 meters away, but the strong wind was pushing the swimmers out into the middle of Jones Bay.

I ordered the six people in two canoes to paddle to the northern point of Jones Bay, start a fire, and prepare dry clothes for the three people in the water. I also asked if the two strongest paddlers in the group could return to help me in one of the canoes. Having a second craft would open up additional rescue possibilities.

I got the weakest swimmer of the group (she could not swim at all nor kick her legs to assist) hanging onto the stern handle of my boat and headed for shore. After 20 minutes of maximum effort paddling I had battled through the wind and towed her to shore. I told those waiting on shore to get her into dry clothes immediately.

As I started out for the second swimmer, the canoe I had asked to assist me suddenly blew by. The two paddlers were completely unable to control the boat in the conditions and immediately blew eastward into the bay, removing the possibility of any help for me. Those two paddlers were eventually blown by the wind onto the eastern shore of the bay and remained on shore until rescued.

The second swimmer had been able to kick his legs aggressively, allowing him to hold his position against the wind. I returned for him, got him holding my kayak, and paddled the 200 meters back to shore as quickly as possible. This person was able to help significantly by kicking his legs aggressively as I towed him.

At this point 6 people (including 2 swimmers) are on the northern point that marks the beginning of Jones Bay and another 2 people are in the boat that has blown onto the eastern shore of Jones Bay. The third swimmer is still in the water and has been immersed for about an hour at this point.
The third swimmer had been unable to hold his position and is now 500 – 600 meters from shore. I race out to get him, locate him, and get him on the back of my kayak. By this point we are in the middle of Jones Bay, the wind has picked up even more, and the waves are 2-4 feet high. For 20 minutes I paddle as hard as I can toward the northern shore of Jones Bay where I have taken the others. After 20 minutes I realized that it was physically impossible to pull him directly into the wind. I shifted to Plan B, which was to try to run with the wind and hopefully make the eastern shore. It was further in distance (over 1 km likely), but I was hoping the strong wind/waves would help drive me. After another 20 minutes of maximal paddling it was clear I was not making progress. The inactive swimmer hanging from the back of the boat was making any meaningful forward progress nearly impossible in the water conditions present. I realized the only way to potentially save the third swimmer was to get a motor boat.

I told him I’d be back and he bailed off my boat. I figured I could paddle the 7 km back to the launch in about 40 minutes, where help could be raised and motor boats activated. I was also holding out hope that I might see one of the Algonquin Outfitters water taxi boats in the interim and wave it down.

I’d traveled about ¼ of the way south toward the put in when I saw an occupied campsite on an island. A couple was standing on the beach looking out into Jones Bay. I quickly told them of the dire situation unfolding and asked if they had any emergency communication device. They did – a Garmin In Reach. They were not that familiar with its use, but I told them told press SOS immediately. I didn’t stop long enough to see if they were successful, but rather kept paddling south as hard as possible. I would find out later the SOS worked at 4:20 PM and emergency services began to converge on Opeongo Lake.

Just a few minutes later (around 4:25 PM) I saw the water taxi boat and was able to wave him over. After I briefed him on the situation he was able to contact a second water taxi nearby and within a few minutes both boats were roaring off into Jones Bay to locate the third swimmer.

I turned my kayak around and headed back out into Jones Bay to assist. Jones Bay is literally 4 square kilometers of water – 2 km wide at its mouth, 2 km deep. By the time I arrived 15 – 20 minutes later they were still searching. Within a few minutes of reaching the middle of Jones Bay I located the third swimmer. It was immediately obvious the situation was now exceptionally critical. With the boats nearly a kilometer away searching the eastern reaches of the Bay, I paddled toward them as fast as could. I had closed about half the distance when the boats spotted me, realized why I was probably paddling toward them, and came to me. I immediately boarded the larger of the two boats, pulled my sea kayak on board, and jumped to the front of the boat to act as primary spotter. Both boats began a high speed grid search of the area I had last seen the third swimmer.

At this point I vaguely remember seeing the red sea kayak of my wife Krista enter the scene. She had reached our campsite and returned as quickly as possible knowing my extended absence meant real trouble.

Around 4:45 PM I spotted the third swimmer (unresponsive) and pulled him into the boat. The boat operators had told me previously that the emergency SOS had the ambulance on its way. Given the condition of the third swimmer I felt his only chance of survival was to get to the launch as quickly as possible and into the care of medical professionals. The water taxi was a very large metal boat with a 225 horsepower engine – both meant for high speed work in rough water. We ran the 10 minutes back to the launch under full power. I was unable to administer any first aid during this journey as the ride was extremely rough.

Upon landing at the docks someone (I’m not certain who) jumped into the boat and began to administer CPR on the third swimmer.

There were probably 50 – 100 people scattered throughout the grounds of Opeongo Outfitters. I canvased them to see if any were doctors, nurses, or medical professionals – none were. Shortly after this the ambulance arrived.

The next phase was to ensure the safe rescue of the other 8 people. When Krista had returned she had distributed emergency blankets, etc. to both the 6 people on the northern shore and the 2 people on the eastern shore. With a flotilla of boats now in action all 8 people were safely returned to the launch.

I’m certain this event will spark much conversation around safe backcountry travel.
In the interim, everyone would be well advised to consider these two points.
1) Cold water kills. Even in southern latitudes most of the Canadian boating season corresponds with water temperatures that can kill you if unprepared.
2) Wear high visibility clothing when partaking in outdoor activities. The victim was wearing a black jacket and dark blue PFD. This made it very difficult to spot him from both my kayak and the boat.
In conclusion, both water taxi operators were fantastic. We immediately formed an effective team once I had flagged them down. I didn’t get the name of either young man driving, but they deserve kudos for their efforts. Thanks to Brandon (also of Algonquin Outfitters) who later joined the effort to help rescue the stranded survivors as well.
Thanks to OPP Constable Jason MacDougall for his professionalism while processing the aftermath of this incident.

~Glenn~

We both feel terribly for this group and the tragic loss they have had to endure. Our condolences to the family members of the deceased.

The sad part was that this tragedy was entirely preventable.
Krista's takeaways:
1. Learn how to swim. Being able to swim 200m with a PFD on could have saved a life.
2. If you travel in the backcountry or anywhere out of cell range, buy a satellite enabled beacon like the Garmin inReach. Activation enabled emergency services quite quickly in this situation.
3. If you own a Garmin inReach know how to use it, especially how to send an SOS message.
4. Wear high-visibility clothing when paddling and wear a PFD. You are easier to spot from a distance.
5. Learn canoeing and canoe rescue skills before backcountry travelling. Take a course through Paddle Canada or ORCKA.
6. Outfitters should screen or have a mandatory orientation in cold water conditions in the fall/spring for all canoe renters and possibly should deny rentals based on ability levels.
7. Paddle Canada/ORCKA need to develop canoe courses and/or educational safety materials that new Canadians can understand (ie different languages).

 

贵圈

Attacks on me, frankly, are attacks on science :)
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后怕。有一年去这个地方, 租他们的划canoe,好远啊。划到到一个岛上。

回程,狂风暴雨。当时,真怕了。还好,没事儿。阿米陀佛。
 

eclipse

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He found two men and a woman in the water alongside the overturned canoe. Two other canoes, each with three people in them, were trying to help, but the conditions were poor and the other paddlers were inexperienced. Wallace recognized the makings of a potential catastrophe.

canoe安全性比不上皮划艇,关键是人数,这伙人经验不够,三个大人一船人太多了。
 

gocanoeing

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He found two men and a woman in the water alongside the overturned canoe. Two other canoes, each with three people in them, were trying to help, but the conditions were poor and the other paddlers were inexperienced. Wallace recognized the makings of a potential catastrophe.

canoe安全性比不上皮划艇,关键是人数,这伙人经验不够,三个大人一船人太多了。
三个成年人一船不是问题。像canoe camping的时候,两个人加上各种camping设备和食物,应该比三个人还重

关键是一船应该至少有一个人知道怎么在船尾划来控制方向,怎么在浪大的时候保持船头和浪有一个角度(i.e. 不要平行),不然环境差一点的话会比较麻烦
 

eclipse

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三个成年人一船不是问题。像canoe camping的时候,两个人加上各种camping设备和食物,应该比三个人还重

关键是一船应该至少有一个人知道怎么在船尾划来控制方向,不然环境差一点的话会比较麻烦

试试就知道了,没有风浪的时候没问题,有小波浪时就感觉多一个人吃力很多。
所以我现在基本只划kayak了,舒服多了,波浪大一点也无所谓。
 

gocanoeing

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试试就知道了,没有风浪的时候没问题,有小波浪时就感觉多一个人吃力很多。
所以我现在基本只划kayak了,舒服多了,波浪大一点也无所谓。
我的经验是重量在划船的时候不是问题,要portage的时候才会是问题。当然重量要平衡,不能在水上的时候发生随便移动,而且保持前进的方向和浪来的方向有一个角度非常重要

至于kayak,我不是太喜欢,因为要两腿伸直坐在船底,而且kayak太重,一个人很难portage

不过kayak的确更能抗风浪,所以浪太大没有把握的话,我宁愿不划
 

Teddy

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为啥 kayak 更抗风浪?是因为能划它的本来就要求水平高,根本不怕翻吗?
 
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所在地
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不会游泳最好不要去玩水。想玩水最好先学好游泳。即使会游泳也不能说没风险,但好多了。
 

ert0000

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不会游泳最好不要去玩水。想玩水最好先学好游泳。即使会游泳也不能说没风险,但好多了。

那个逝者在水里游了1个小时,应该是会游泳的,现在温度低,在低温下1个小时是很不容易的,要有相当水平的游泳体能训练才能扛得住。
就是在夏天最热的时候能在户外连续游1个小时的华人也不多,况且有风浪。
 

uglyducking

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那个逝者在水里游了1个小时,应该是会游泳的,现在温度低,在低温下1个小时是很不容易的,要有相当水平的游泳体能训练才能扛得住。
就是在夏天最热的时候能在户外连续游1个小时的华人也不多,况且有风浪。
你知道几个华人会游泳:eek::kan:
 

gocanoeing

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为啥 kayak 更抗风浪?是因为能划它的本来就要求水平高,根本不怕翻吗?
kayak重心低,不容易翻,就算翻了有足够训练的人也应该很容易正过来(但是没有足够训练的人会怎么样呢,hehehe)
 

ert0000

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你知道几个华人会游泳:eek::kan:

咱村老中中,能在游泳池游1个小时的不少,能在室外空旷水域连续游1个小时真不多,坐不满一个教室,
能户外连续游2个小时的屈指可数。现在这天气,水温应该在15度以下,,,,更少了。。。
 
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