"一切都是刚刚开始": Papadopoulos被判刑, Manafort 被裁定8项罪名成立、Gates, Flynn, Cohen, Patten认罪

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    (CNN) Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former personal attorney, pleaded guilty in Manhattan federal court Tuesday to eight criminal counts, admitting that "in coordination and at the direction of a candidate for federal office" he acted to keep information that would have been harmful to the candidate and the campaign from becoming public during the 2016 election cycle.

    The charges against Cohen, an attorney for Trump until earlier this year and a member of his inner circle throughout his presidential campaign, bring an end to a months-long investigation by the US Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York.

    The counts against Cohen included tax fraud, false statements to a bank and campaign finance violations tied to his work for Trump, including payments Cohen made or helped orchestrate that were designed to silence women who claimed affairs with the then-candidate.

    Though not named in the plea deal filed in court, the women whom Cohen helped silence were two who have since gone public with their claims of sexual encounters or affairs with Trump: a porn star named Stephanie Clifford, who goes by the stage name Stormy Daniels, and a former Playboy model named Karen McDougal. Trump has denied the claims.

    In the case of Clifford, Cohen arranged a nondisclosure agreement for which he paid her $130,000, and for that Cohen was charged with making an excessive campaign contribution, since the payment was made in service of the campaign and exceeded the federal limit.

    McDougal, Cohen and the CEO of a media company "worked together to keep an individual from publicly disclosing" information that would have been harmful to a candidate, saying the individual received $150,000. In the summer of 2016, the publisher of the National Enquirer, American Media Inc. paid McDougal $150,000 for a contract that effectively silenced her claims of an affair with Trump.

    Appearing in court on Tuesday, Cohen said of the charge linked to McDougal that it was done "for the principal purpose of influencing the election." Regarding the charge linked to Clifford, Cohen said the money "was later repaid to me by the candidate."

    Cohen faces up to 65 years in prison.

    Judge William H. Pauley set a sentencing date for Cohen for December 12. The judge set a $500,000 bond, which must be co-signed by Cohen's wife and another party.

    When checking if he was of sound mind, Pauley asked Cohen whether he had consumed alcohol. Cohen replied that he had some alcohol with dinner the previous evening -- a Lillet on the rocks.

    The plea deal
    Shortly after 4 p.m., Cohen entered court in a dark suit, white shirt and gold tie, followed moments later by his attorney, Guy Petrillo. Cohen had surrendered to the FBI earlier Tuesday.

    The deal would include jail time and a substantial monetary fine.

    Jail time was one of the sticking points in the negotiations between the two sides, according to one source. Cohen had been pressing for three years but prosecutors sought 50 months.

    Cohen has been concerned about asset forfeiture, and the possibility that he would leave his family with nothing. Prosecutors made clear there was a bigger risk that he would have to forfeit assets should he go to trial and be found guilty.

    Also in attendance to observe Cohen's guilty plea in court were Deputy US Attorney Robert Khuzami and the public corruption chief for the Southern District of New York.

    [​IMG]



    As part of the plea deal under discussion earlier Tuesday, Cohen was not expected to cooperate with the government, one source told CNN. However, by pleading guilty both Cohen and prosecutors would avoid the spectacle and uncertainty of a trial.

    A plea deal could be a significant blow for Trump. Cohen was part of Trump's inner circle for more than a decade, working as his personal attorney at the Trump Organization and continuing to advise the President after the election. Cohen once said he would take a bullet for Trump, but the relationship between the two men has frayed since an FBI raid in April of Cohen's office, hotel room and home.

    Trump has distanced himself from Cohen, who has told friends he has felt isolated, according to the friends. Last month, Cohen told ABC News his loyalty is to his family and country first, not the President.

    On Tuesday morning, Cohen was seen entering his attorney's office and did not respond to questions. Cohen's attorneys, Petrillo and Lanny Davis, didn't immediately respond to requests for comment. A spokesman for the US attorney's office declined to comment.

    The investigation
    The Cohen investigation was referred to the Southern District of New York by special counsel Robert Mueller. The plea deal does not include cooperation by Cohen, and it is unclear if he will follow through on his previous assertion to friends, according to sources, that he is willing to talk to Mueller.

    Prosecutors said in court their investigation is into Cohen's personal financial dealings. The search warrant authorizing the FBI raid referenced Cohen's taxi medallion business, the identity of banks that loaned him money and payments made to suppress negative information during the presidential campaign.

    It's not clear how the plea deal with Cohen might affect other entities that have been under scrutiny by federal prosecutors as part of the Cohen investigation, including the publisher of the National Enquirer, American Media Inc.

    This is an absolutely critical moment for Donald Trump's presidency
    CNN and the The New York Times reported Sunday that investigators were finalizing criminal charges against Cohen and could announce them by the end of the month.

    According to the Times, investigators were trying to determine whether Cohen misrepresented the value of his assets to obtain the loans from two financial institutions that have catered to the taxi industry. They were also scrutinizing whether he failed to properly report his income from taxi medallions to the Internal Revenue Service, the Times reported.

    CNN previously reported in April that Cohen is under investigation for possible bank and tax fraud, that his taxi medallions are a focus of the investigation, and that one of the banks that made the loans was Sterling National Bank, whose spokesman declined to comment earlier this month about federal scrutiny of the loans. The Times, citing financial records and people with knowledge of the matter, reported that the other financial institution is the Melrose Credit Union.

    Prosecutors have been scrutinizing a variety of documents submitted by Cohen to various institutions, including those to the Internal Revenue Service and those to Sterling National Bank, CNN has reported.
     
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    Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former personal lawyer and "fixer," has pleaded guilty to campaign finance violations and other charges, saying he and Trump arranged the payment of hush money to porn star Stormy Daniels and a former Playboy model to influence the election.

    The guilty plea came Tuesday — almost at the same moment former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was convicted in Alexandria, Va., of eight financial crimes in the first trial to come out of special counsel Robert Mueller's sprawling Russia investigation.

    In a deal reached with federal prosecutors, Cohen, 51, pleaded guilty to eight counts in all, including tax evasion and making a false statement to a financial institution. He could get about four to five years in prison at sentencing on Dec. 12.

    In entering the plea, Cohen did not specifically name the two women or Trump, recounting instead that he worked with an "unnamed candidate." But the amounts and the dates all lined up with the payments made to Daniels and Karen McDougal.

    After Cohen's guilty plea, deputy U.S. Attorney Robert Khuzami told reporters that he submitted invoices to the candidate's company to obtain reimbursement for the unlawful campaign contributions.

    Cohen said the first payment was "in co-ordination and at the direction of a candidate for federal office," and the second was made "under direction of the same candidate."

    Cohen's plea follows months of scrutiny from federal investigations and a falling out with the president, whom he previously said he'd "take a bullet" for.

    FBI raids in April sought bank records, communications with Trump's campaign and information on payments to Daniels and McDougal.

    Both women claimed Trump had affairs with them, which he has denied.

    It wasn't clear if the plea agreement requires Cohen's co-operation with the Russia probe or other investigations.


    [​IMG]
    U.S. President Donald Trump ignored questions about Cohen as he boarded Air Force One for a campaign visit to West Virginia. (Alex Brandon/Associated Press)

    President ignores questions
    Trump ignored questions about Cohen as he boarded Air Force One for a campaign visit to West Virginia. The White House and the Trump re-election campaign did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

    The president has fumed publicly about what he felt was government overreach, while privately worrying about what material Cohen may have after working for the Trump Organization for a decade.

    Trump branded the raid "a witch hunt," an assault on attorney-client privilege and a politically motivated attack by enemies in the FBI.

    "Obviously it's not good for Trump," Sol Wisenberg, who conducted grand jury questioning of then-president Bill Clinton during the Whitewater investigation, said of Cohen plea bargain.

    "I'm assuming he's not going to be indicted because he's a sitting president," Wisenberg added. "But it leads him closer to ultimate impeachment proceedings, particularly if the Democrats take back the House."

    What it shows is that the people close to the president have criminal exposure and it may mean they don't need Cohen to co-operate.- Laurie Levenson , former federal prosecutor

    The Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, which provides legal advice and guidance to executive branch agencies, has held that a president cannot be indicted while in office. Trump's lawyers have said that Mueller plans to adhere to that guidance, though Mueller's office has never confirmed that. There would presumably be no bar against charging a president after he leaves the White House.

    Laurie Levenson, a former federal prosecutor and professor at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles, noted that the deal does not require Cohen to co-operate, but does not preclude it from happening, which should be worrying to the president and his allies.

    "What it shows is that the people close to the president have criminal exposure and it may mean they don't need Cohen to co-operate," she said.

    Levenson argued the deal also knocks back the argument that the investigations swirling around Trump are a "witch hunt."

    "No longer can you say Mueller is on a witch hunt when you have his own lawyer pleading guilty to things that were designed to impact the election," she said.

    On Tuesday, Cohen's lawyer Lanny Lewis suggested Trump should face criminal charges.

    "If those payments were a crime for Michael Cohen, then why wouldn't they be a crime for Donald Trump?," he tweeted.

    upload_2018-8-21_19-28-47.png

    Mueller's team is looking into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The team referred the case involving Cohen's financial dealings to federal prosecutors in Manhattan.


    [​IMG]
    In this April 16, 2018, photo, Stormy Daniels, left, stands with her lawyer Michael Avenatti as she speaks outside federal court in New York. Avenatti tweeted that Cohen's plea deal should open the door to questioning Trump under oath in Daniels's defamation lawsuit against him. (Mary Altaffer/Associated Press)

    Loyal 'fixer' under investigation for months
    The search of Cohen's files sought bank records, communications with the Trump campaign and information on hush money payments made in 2016 to former Playboy model McDougal, who received $150,000 US, and the porn actress Daniels, who got $130,000 US.

    Daniels's hard-charging lawyer, Michael Avenatti, later upped the drama by disclosing bank reports showing that Cohen had been hustling behind the scenes to cash in on his close relationship with the president.

    Avenatti tweeted that Cohen's plea agreement should open the door to questioning Trump under oath in Daniels's defamation lawsuit against him about "what he knew, when he knew it, and what he did about it."

    upload_2018-8-21_19-29-18.png

    Trusted member of Trump organization
    The New York Times reported earlier this week, based on anonymous sources, that prosecutors have been focusing on more than $20 million in loans obtained by taxi businesses that Cohen and his family own.

    Before the election, Cohen had been a trusted member of the Trump organization, working out of an office in Trump Tower next to one used by his boss.

    He raised millions for Trump's campaign and, after being interviewed by the House Intelligence Committee last year, told Vanity Fair that Trump had no part in the suspected Russian conspiracy to tamper with the election.

    The president's initial support for Cohen after the raid has since degenerated into a public feud, prompting speculation that, to save himself, Cohen might be willing to tell prosecutors some of the secrets he helped Trump keep.

    Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani has steadily ratcheted up attacks on Cohen, suggesting he was untrustworthy and lying about what he knew about the former celebrity real estate developer's business dealings.

    When Cohen's team produced a recording he had made of Trump discussing a payment to silence a woman about an alleged affair, Giuliani went on a media tour to impugn his credibility and question his loyalty.
     
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    Michael Cohen, the former longtime fixer and personal attorney for Donald Trump, appeared in federal court in New York Tuesday afternoon, pleaded guilty to eight counts and said that he made illegal campaign contributions "in coordination and at the direction of a candidate for federal office."

    The "candidate" Cohen referred to was not named in court or in the criminal information charging document but one of Cohen's lawyers, Lanny Davis, later said that Cohen had "testified under oath that Donald Trump directed him to commit a crime."

    The campaign finance violations are associated with Cohen’s role in alleged hush money agreements with two women, Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal, who claim to have had affairs with Trump.

    While the criminal information does not name Trump, the document does identify Cohen as the personal attorney "to Individual-1, who at that point had become the President of the United States."

    The information states that Cohen made a contribution to "Individual-1" and "did so by making and causing to be made an expenditure, in cooperation, consultation, and concert with, and at the request and suggestion of one or more members of the campaign, to wit, COHEN made a $130,000 payment to Woman-2 to ensure that she not publicize damaging allegation before the 2016 presidential election and thereby influence that election."

    “I participated in this conduct for the principal purpose” of influencing an election, Cohen said.

    The president's current personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, was quick to react.

    "There is no allegation of any wrongdoing against the President in the government's charges against Mr. Cohen. It is clear that, as the prosecutor noted, Mr. Cohen's actions reflect a pattern of lies and dishonesty over a significant period of time,” Giuliani said in a statement.

    Davis, Cohen's lawyer, countered: "Michael Cohen took this step today so that his family can move on to the next chapter."

    "This is Michael fulfilling his promise made on July 2nd to put his family and country first and tell the truth about Donald Trump," Davis continued, referring to comments Cohen made in an interview with ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos.

    "Today he stood up and testified under oath that Donald Trump directed him to commit a crime by making payments to two women for the principal purpose of influencing an election. If those payments were a crime for Michael Cohen, then why wouldn't they be a crime for Donald Trump?” Davis said.

    Cohen, wearing a dark suit and yellow tie, came in looking relaxed and even appeared to wink at the journalists behind him, but he stiffened as the hearing proceeded.

    The federal judge asked him numerous questions about waiving his rights and addressed his competency to do so.

    Cohen responded that “in four days I’ll be 52.” He said he hasn’t been treated for psychological problems or addiction but said “last night I had a glass of Glenlivet 12 on the rocks,” referring to the pricey, single malt Scotch whiskey, which he said was not his custom.

    Cohen had agreed to a deal with federal prosecutors in the Southern District of New York that required him to plead guilty to the violations of campaign finance law as well as several felony charges of bank fraud and tax evasion.

    The tax charges stem from Cohen’s personal business dealings and investments in real estate and the taxi industry.

    When the federal judge asked Cohen if he understood that he could get a maximum sentence of 65 years in prison if sentenced consecutively, Cohen said “yes.”

    The government estimates Cohen would face some significant prison time under the deal, which will also require Cohen to make a substantial monetary forfeiture.

    Though Cohen has been for weeks publicly signaling a willingness to consider a cooperation pact with authorities, it is unclear if there is a provision in the deal that requires Cohen to cooperate in ongoing federal investigations, either in New York or in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

    There was no immediate indication of a cooperation agreement with the government -- but the absence of a cooperation deal - while it would be notable - would not completely eliminate the possibility that Cohen could subsequently provide information to investigators that might result in a more lenient sentence.

    Given Cohen’s proximity to Trump during the past decade, including throughout his meteoric rise from mogul and reality television star to the White House, observers consider him one of most potent legal thorns to confront Trump’s presidency since he took office.

    “The guy who knows where all the bodies are buried,” said Seth Hettena, an author and veteran journalist who has chronicled Trump’s business career.

    The investigation into Cohen was referred to New York’s Southern District by special counsel Robert Mueller, and if Cohen agrees to cooperate, the information he provides could benefit the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. But it remains unclear if he has committed to cooperate.

    Cohen’s relationship with Trump dates to the mid-2000’s after Cohen, who owned condominiums in multiple Trump buildings in New York, took Trump’s side in a legal dispute with the condo board at Trump World Tower on Manhattan’s East Side. Cohen eventually went to work for the Trump Organization, where he held the positions of executive vice president and special counsel to Donald J. Trump.



    [​IMG]Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images
    Michael Cohen, former personal lawyer for President Donald Trump, exits the United States District Court Southern District of New York on May 30, 2018 in New York City.

    "Michael Cohen has great insight into the real estate market," Trump said of Cohen in a 2007 New York Post interview. "He has invested in my buildings because he likes to make money – and he does."

    In addition to working inside the Trump Organization as a lawyer and problem solver, Cohen built a diverse portfolio of investments.

    At one point that included running 260 yellow cabs with a Ukrainian-born partner – a partnership that ended in 2012. He also invested millions in real estate, often turning a tidy profit. For instance, a building he bought in 2011 on the Lower East Side of Manhattan for $2.1 million, sold three years later for $10 million in cash.

    The FBI raid on Cohen’s home and office in April gave the most significant indication his business dealings could become a legal problem for him.

    For more than a decade around the office in Trump Tower – and around New York – Cohen’s loyalty to Trump was unquestioned as he developed a reputation as Trump's "pit bull."

    "It means that if somebody does something Mr. Trump doesn't like, I do everything in my power to resolve it to Mr. Trump's benefit," Cohen said in a 2011 interview with ABC News. "If you do something wrong, I'm going to come at you, grab you by the neck and I'm not going to let you go until I'm finished."

    In 2010, Cohen was among the creators of a website, ShouldTrumpRun.org, that sought to encourage the New York real estate tycoon and reality television star to pursue a challenge to President Barrack Obama in the 2012 election.

    "I think the world of [Trump]," Cohen told ABC News in the 2011 interview. "I respect him as a businessman, and I respect him as a boss."

    Cohen’s dealings at the Trump family business covers a broad sweep of its global empire – including several projects that have caught the attention of federal investigators. Cohen played an integral role in early discussions about a possible Trump Tower in Moscow – negotiations that were going on during the early months of the 2016 presidential campaign.

    That deal never reached fruition.

    “He could be extremely valuable,” said Matthew G. Olsen, a former federal prosecutor and ABC News contributor. “He was not just a personal lawyer but also was President Trump’s so-called fixer for a number of years. So he would have had access to lots of very personal information involving his business dealings.”

    In January - the Wall Street Journal first revealed Cohen’s role in negotiating a secret non-disclosure agreement with adult-film actress Stephanie Clifford, aka Stormy Daniels. The deal – which was executed less than two weeks prior to the November presidential election – paid Daniels $130,000 in exchange for her silence.

    Government watchdog groups quickly filed complaints with the Federal Election Commission and the Department of Justice, asking the agencies to investigate for possible violations of campaign finance law.

    Following the disclosure of the Daniels’ deal, Cohen insisted that he had acted on his own in the Daniels deal and that he had not been reimbursed by the campaign or the Trump Organization.

    He told ABC News that the funds used to pay Daniels came from an existing home equity line of credit.

    Two sources familiar with the search warrant that led to the raids on Cohen properties told ABC News in April that federal agents were hunting for records tied to Cohen’s personal business dealings and secret deals with Trump's alleged mistresses, media organizations during the 2016 presidential campaign.

    On April 5, four days before the authorities raided Cohen’s properties in New York, President Trump told reporters on Air Force One that he didn’t know why Cohen had paid Daniels or where he had gotten the money to pay her. The president later acknowledged, in a financial disclosure form filed last month with the Office of Government Ethics, that he had reimbursed Cohen.

    Then there is Karen McDougal, who in August 2016 signed a $150,000 deal with American Media Inc., the publisher of the National Enquirer, that transferred to the company the rights to her story of an alleged ten-month romantic affair with Trump in 2006. The magazine never published her story. McDougal alleged in a lawsuit filed earlier this year that Cohen had allegedly conspired with her former attorney to bury the story. McDougal settled her lawsuit.

    President Trump, through his representatives, has denied the allegations of McDougal and Daniels.
     
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    特朗普前竞选团队负责人马纳福特被判部分罪名成立
    2018-08-22 11:20:52 来源: 新华网

      新华社华盛顿8月21日电(记者徐剑梅)美国弗吉尼亚州联邦地区法院陪审团21日裁定,美国总统特朗普前竞选团队负责人马纳福特有8项罪名成立。特朗普当天回应说,马纳福特所犯罪行“与‘通俄’毫无关系”,被判罪名成立也“不涉及我”。

      综合美国媒体报道,马纳福特共受到18项指控,“八宗罪”包括5起税务诈骗、两起银行诈骗和一起隐匿海外银行帐户罪,涉及金额数以百万美元计,另外10项罪名因陪审团未达成一致意见,联邦法官埃利斯当庭宣布审理无效。

      马纳福特7月31日起在弗吉尼亚州联邦地区法院受审,面临税收诈骗、银行诈骗等指控,涉及他之前代表乌克兰亲俄势力进行的游说工作,与其在特朗普竞选团队任职无关。

      尽管如此,马纳福特所受控罪是特别检察官米勒团队在调查“通俄门”过程中发现的,这也是第一起由米勒团队提诉和联邦法院审理判决的案件,备受美国朝野关注。

      米勒团队去年起以洗钱、密谋反美、作伪证等10多项罪名起诉马纳福特及其长期商业伙伴盖茨,盖茨今年2月就密谋反美和作伪证指控认罪,并与米勒团队达成合作协议。

      马纳福特现年69岁,是美国资深说客,2016年3月加入特朗普竞选团队,同年6月成为竞选团队负责人,当年8月因收受乌克兰亲俄政党酬劳并为其进行政治游说一事曝光被迫离职。

      今年9月,马纳福特还将在位于首都华盛顿特区的联邦地区法院受审,罪名涉及洗钱等。
     
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    特朗普前私人律师科亨承认违反竞选资金法等罪名
    2018-08-22 11:58:25 来源: 新华网

      新华社华盛顿8月21日电(记者徐剑梅)曾长期担任美国总统特朗普私人律师的迈克尔·科亨21日在纽约曼哈顿联邦地区法院出庭,就8项指控向检方认罪。

      综合美国媒体报道,科亨所承认罪名包括违反美国竞选资金相关法律、逃税和银行诈骗等。联邦法官威廉·波利定于今年12月12日判决此案。

      《纽约时报》报道说,科亨当庭供称,大约在2016年夏,他按照“一名公职竞选人”指示并与其合作,向公众隐瞒了可能对这名竞选人及其选战不利的信息。科亨没有提到这名竞选人的名字,但多家美国媒体认为,科亨指的是2016年美国总统选举期间他替特朗普向艳星丹尼尔斯等人支付“封口费”一事。

      今年4月,美国联邦调查局突然搜查科亨在纽约的办公室、住所和旅馆房间,收缴了电子邮件、税务文件和科亨向艳星丹尼尔斯支付款项的记录等。美媒当时报道说,联邦调查局收缴的文件还包括科亨和特朗普之间的业务往来与联络记录。

      科亨遭搜查后,特朗普改组了自己的律师团队,聘请前纽约市长鲁迪·朱利安尼出任私人律师。
     
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    特朗普前律师科亨认罪 恐将面临四五年监禁
    2018-08-23 06:57:01 来源: 新华网

      美国总统唐纳德·特朗普的前私人律师迈克尔·科亨21日在纽约曼哈顿联邦地区法院就违反竞选资金法规等8项指控向检方认罪。

      科亨在法庭答辩时承认受“一名联邦公职竞选人”指派,在2016年美国总统选举竞选期间向两名女性支付“封口费”,以影响选情。他的律师发表声明,直指特朗普为那名竞选人。

      【认罪】

      科亨现年51岁,当天他在法庭上承认违反竞选资金法规、逃税和银行诈骗等8项罪名,缴纳50万美元保释金后获释。联邦法官威廉·波利定于今年12月12日作出判决,科亨恐面临四五年监禁。

      法新社描述,科亨在法庭上看似垂头丧气,声音不时颤抖;美联社注意到,庭审结束后,科亨望向窗外,有擦去眼泪动作。



      科亨在法庭上说,其中一笔“封口费”应“一名联邦公职竞选人”指示支付,另一笔应这名竞选人指示、经他与竞选人协调完成。“我参与这一行为,旨在影响选举。”

      按美联社的说法,科亨所述两笔“封口费”中的一笔13万美元付给了艳星丹尼尔斯,另一笔15万美元给了《花花公子》杂志模特卡伦·麦克杜格尔。两人均称与特朗普有染,遭特朗普否认。

      路透社报道,科亨律师兰尼·戴维斯在庭审后发表声明,点破特朗普的身份,认为特朗普下令科亨支付“封口费”的首要目的是“影响选举”。

      不过,美联社报道,纽约检方发布的控方文件、新闻消息稿和庭外评论都没有指名道姓,只说科亨与“一名联邦公职竞选人或其竞选团队协作影响选举”。

      【撇清】

      美国联邦副检察官罗伯特·胡扎米说,除违反竞选资金法规,科亨2012年至2016年瞒报逾400万美元收入;向一家金融机构隐瞒逾1400万美元债务,以骗取50万美元住房贷款,用其中一部分“封口”艳星丹尼尔斯;多次用假发票谎称2017年的律师服务费,通过特朗普名下企业要回“封口费”,但实际上他去年未向特朗普提供法律咨询服务。

      科亨曾长期担任特朗普私人律师,在特朗普集团深受信赖;他在特朗普大厦的办公室紧邻特朗普本人的一间。他曾为特朗普竞选团队筹得数以百万美元计资金。

      然而,美国联邦调查局今年4月突击搜查科亨在纽约的办公室、住所和酒店房间后,他与特朗普渐行渐远。特朗普随后改组律师团队,聘请前纽约市长鲁迪·朱利安尼出任私人律师。

      特朗普21日晚在西弗吉尼亚州查尔斯顿为国会中期选举造势,其间未直接提及科亨以及同样官司缠身的前竞选团队经理保罗·马纳福特。

      朱利安尼在科亨认罪后发声,说科亨显现长期“说谎、不诚实”习惯,而检方对科亨的指控不包含对特朗普有过失的指认。他告诉路透社:“我认为总统绝对没有危险。科亨这事已翻篇。”

      【不妙】

      法新社推断,科亨认罪对白宫影响最大。按照美国司法惯例,总统无法接受司法审理,但科亨的指认如果属实,会激发弹劾特朗普的诉求。

      曾在美国司法部分管公共诚信的前检察官丹尼尔·佩塔拉斯告诉美联社,特朗普是否违法要看他“是否试图影响选举,他是否知道(“封口费”)并下令支付,以及他是否知道这不合适”。

      曾任独立副检察官的索尔·维森贝格说,需要了解科亨认罪交易的更多细节,但“明显对特朗普不妙”。

      科亨面临的司法审理与特别检察官罗伯特·米勒主导的“通俄”调查没有直接关联,但正是“通俄”调查牵出科亨支付“封口费”一事。米勒团队随后将案件交给纽约联邦检方调查。

      美联社评述,科亨认罪对米勒有利。曾任联邦检察官的法学教授劳丽·利文森认为,科亨认罪打破了所谓“通俄”调查是“政治迫害”的说法。
     
  8. New Person

    New Person 资深人士 ID:11416

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    Trump insists he learned of Michael Cohen payments 'later on,' in 'Fox & Friends' exclusive
    President Trump, in an exclusive interview with Fox News’ Ainsley Earhardt, insisted he only knew about hush-money payments made by Michael Cohen “later on” despite his ex-lawyer's claims to the contrary, while maintaining they were not campaign funds.

    “Later on I knew. Later on. What he did—and they weren’t taken out of the campaign finance, that’s the big thing. That’s a much bigger thing,” Trump said Wednesday. “Did they come out of the campaign? They didn’t come out of the campaign, they came from me.”

    The president’s comments come after his former longtime personal attorney and self-described “fixer” entered a guilty plea with federal prosecutors on Tuesday, admitting to violating campaign finance laws by arranging hush money payments to adult film star Stormy Daniels and Playboy model Karen McDougal “at the direction” of then-candidate Trump.

    The plea deal stated the payments were meant to influence the election -- by covering up affair allegations -- and the campaign was involved.

    WATCH AINSLEY EARHARDT'S EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH TRUMP ON 'FOX & FRIENDS' AT 6 AM EST THURSDAY ON FOX NEWS CHANNEL.

    “I don’t know if you know but I tweeted about the payments,” Trump said in the "Fox & Friends" interview, pushing back. “But they didn’t come out of the campaign. In fact, my first question when I heard about it was, did they come out of the campaign, because that could be a little dicey. And they didn’t come out of the campaign and that’s big.”

    He added: “But they weren’t .... that’s not even a campaign violation.”

    The president was referring to his May 3 tweets regarding his move to reimburse Cohen for the $130,000 payment to Daniels.

    “Mr. Cohen, an attorney, received a monthly retainer, not from the campaign and having nothing to do with the campaign, from which he entered into, through reimbursement, a private contract between two parties, known as a non-disclosure agreement, or NDA,” Trump tweeted.

    “Those agreements are very common among celebrities and people of wealth. In this case it is in full force and effect and will be used in Arbitration for damages against Ms. Clifford (Daniels). The agreement was used to stop the false and extortionist accusations made by her about an affair,” Trump added, continuing, “…despite already having signed a detailed letter admitting that there was no affair. Prior to its violation by Ms. Clifford and her attorney, this was a private agreement. Money from the campaign, or campaign contributions, played no roll [sic] in this transaction.”

    Trump, in those tweets, was referring to a letter written and signed by Daniels in January, stating “with complete clarity” that allegations of an affair with Trump were “completely false.”

    Despite admitting to knowing about the payments this week, and on Twitter in May, the president initially said he did not know about the $130,000 transaction.

    In May, Trump’s attorney Rudy Giuliani told Fox News that Trump “didn’t know the details of this until we knew the details of this,” adding that Trump thought it was to cover unspecified “expenses,” following the release of a financial disclosure.

    Cohen, who also pleaded guilty to several charges of bank and tax fraud and could face 65 years in prison, initially said the money he paid to Daniels came out of his own pocket.

    “If you look at President Obama, he had a massive campaign violation but he had a different attorney general and they viewed it a lot differently,” Trump said.

    Trump was referring to Obama's 2008 campaign being fined $375,000 by the Federal Election Commission for a series of missing notices for more than 1,300 contributions. They totaled $1.8 million.

    But Lanny Davis, Cohen’s attorney, argued that there is little room for interpretation as to whether the president could be in legal trouble.

    “There is no question that he’s committed a federal crime,” Davis said on “America’s Newsroom” Wednesday. He also argued that it’s never been settled whether a sitting president can be indicted, despite suggestions to the contrary from Trump allies.

    At issue is the Daniels payment as well as the McDougal case, where she was paid $150,000 by the parent company of the National Enquirer for her story about an alleged 2006 affair with Trump, which it never published. Cohen admitted Tuesday to making an excessive campaign contribution and causing an unlawful corporate contribution.

    After Cohen's plea deal, Davis also initially said that Trump’s lawyers wrote a letter to Special Counsel Robert Mueller admitting Trump “directed” Cohen to make the payment to Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford.
     
  9. 向问天

    向问天 日月神教光明左使 ID:112302 VIP

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    知法犯法,都是坏人。
    川普太不容易了。
     
  10. ccc

    ccc 难得糊涂 ID:6614 管理成员 VIP

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    [​IMG]

    There’s hardly been a day this summer in which President Donald Trump didn’t turn to Twitter to vent his frustration with what the president calls the “RIGGED WITCH HUNT” ― the investigation led by special counsel Robert Mueller into potential collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. But as the president’s animosity for the special counsel ramps up, the Mueller probe is hardly the only investigation the president has to worry about.

    There are currently five separate investigations into Trump and his associates from four different investigative bodies. An additional lawsuit brought by two state attorneys general challenges whether Trump is in violation of the U.S. Constitution. There are further reports about probes into the financial dealings of the president’s eldest daughter, Ivanka Trump, and his second eldest son, Eric Trump.

    Here’s your guide to the latest probes, indictments, cooperating witnesses and potential targets:

    Department of Justice Special Counsel Robert Mueller Probes Russian Conspiracy
    Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appointed Robert Mueller ― the second-longest-serving FBI director in history ― in May 2017 as special counsel to take control of the investigation into whether Trump, his campaign, his business and his other associates conspired to work with Russian hackers to influence the 2016 election. Mueller is reportedly also probing whether Trump obstructed justice.

    The Russia Connection
    The FBI had been investigating possible ties between Russia and the Trump campaign since July 2016. In 2016, Russian hackers allegedly broke into the Democratic Party’s servers and gained access to the emails of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman, John Podesta. They stole emails and documents and provided them to WikiLeaks, which then strategically leaked the documents at times inopportune for the Clinton campaign and opportune for the Trump campaign. Trump publicly called on Russian hackers to steal more documents to help his campaign on July 27, 2016. A few hours later, hackers made their first, ultimately unsuccessful attempt to break into Clinton’s private email server.

    It was and remains an open question to what extent Trump and his campaign knew about this effort, to what extent they sought to obtain this information and whether there was any direct involvement in the release of the hacked emails and documents.

    There are also questions surrounding a June 9 meeting in Trump Tower between Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnistkaya, Donald Trump, Jr. ― the president’s eldest son ― then-campaign chair Paul Manafort and the president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, to receive what they were told would be “some official documents and information that would incriminate Hillary and her dealings with Russia” as “part of Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump.”

    [​IMG]
    HuffPost Illustration/Getty Images
    Roger Stone, Trump’s former political consigliere and an ex-lobbyist who worked with Manafort, is also in Mueller’s sights. Stone was known to have been in contact with both Wikileaks’ Julian Assange and Guccifer 2.0, the false online persona of the Russian hackers who infiltrated the Democratic Party, during the 2016 campaign. He was also openly involved in a disinformation campaign through a super PAC that spent money to publicize a false narrative that Democrats would steal the election. The special counsel’s office has already questioned or sought testimony from numerous Stone associates including Sam Nunberg, Ted Malloch, Kristen Davis and John Kakanis. Mueller is also attempting to obtain the testimony of Stone aide Andrew Miller, but Miller is refusing to comply and is challenging the constitutionality of the entire Mueller investigation. Randy Credico, a perennial political candidate and comedian who reportedly acted as a go-between for Stone and Assange, is scheduled to testify on Sept. 7.

    Mueller is also investigating the potential role Erik Prince, the infamous private military contractor, played in establishing a back channel to the Russian government for the incoming Trump administration. Prince reportedly met with Kirill Dmitriev, the head of Russia’s sovereign wealth fund, in the Seychelles after Trump’s election. The meeting was facilitated by the crown prince of the United Arab Emirates and George Nader, the crown prince’s adviser. Prince claims the Seychelles meeting with Dmitriev was a chance encounter. Nader is cooperating with Mueller.

    The special counsel’s team has also sought information on the Trump campaign’s digital efforts, including from the now-defunct British data company Cambridge Analytica, and the possible donation of funds to Trump’s campaign and inauguration from Russian or other foreign donors.

    Obstruction Of Justice
    The obstruction of justice investigation is reportedly zeroing in on Trump’s decision to fire FBI Director James Comey. Trump told NBC’s Lester Holt he was thinking about the FBI investigation into the ties between his campaign and Russia when he fired Comey.

    Mueller is also looking into Trump’s role in drafting a misleading statement for his son Donald Trump, Jr. that aimed to cover-up the true purpose of the June 9 meeting at Trump Tower.

    The Balance So Far
    Mueller has reached guilty plea deals with ex-Trump National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos and campaign deputy chairman Rick Gates and obtained a guilty conviction for Manafort on eight counts. (Mueller handed off investigations into the other foreign lobbyists who worked with Manafort ― Tony Podesta, Vin Weber and Greg Craig ― to prosecutors in the Southern District of New York.) So far, none of these pleas or convictions prove that the Trump campaign conspired with a foreign government to influence the presidential election.

    Mueller has also indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian companies for running an extensive propaganda campaign on social media sites and another 12 Russian military intelligence officers for their role in hacking the DNC and John Podesta’s email. Richard Pinedo, an American businessman, pleaded guilty to selling bank numbers to the Russian social media trolls. Additionally, the special counsel indicted Konstantin Kilimnik, a Manafort associate, for allegedly obstructing justice by tampering with witnesses in Manafort’s case. Another Manafort associate, Alex van der Zwaan, pleaded guilty to lying under oath in relation to Manafort’s case.

    U.S. Attorney for the SDNY Geoffrey Berman Probes Michael Cohen For Tax Evasion, Fraud, Campaign Finance Violations
    Former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen on Aug. 21 pleaded guilty to six charges of tax evasion and bank fraud and two charges of violating campaign finance laws. The campaign finance charges implicate Trump in potential felony violations of the law.

    In court, Cohen stated that Trump directed him to pay off two alleged Trump mistresses, former Playboy model Karen McDougal and adult film actress Stormy Daniels, because their allegations endangered his presidential campaign and that these payments constituted illegal in-kind campaign contributions.

    [​IMG]
    HuffPost Illustration/Getty Images
    U.S. Attorney for Southern District of New York Geoffrey Berman.
    Cohen also detailed his collaboration with longtime Trump friend and American Medida Inc. chief executive David Pecker. Pecker connected with Cohen to strike a deal that would give the Trump campaign a heads up if his reporters encountered information that could be damaging to Trump and his presidential bid, Cohen claimed. And it was Pecker who alerted Cohen to McDougal’s allegation that she had an affair with Trump from 2006-07, according to court documents. Cohen encouraged Pecker to purchase McDougal’s story and never publish. McDougal received $150,000 from American Media, Inc., the parent corporation of National Enquirer, in August 2016.

    Pecker became aware that Daniels was looking to sell her story about her affair with Trump in October 2016 and alerted Cohen. Cohen then paid $130,000 out of his own pocket to buy the rights to Daniels’ story and to prevent its publication. He was reimbursed by a mix of funds from the Trump Organization and Trump himself. Cohen’s plea stated that Trump was aware of and personally directed this effort to protect and help his own presidential campaign.

    In order to verify Cohen’s version of events, prosecutors have provided immunity to a number of people alluded to in the plea agreement who could have faced criminal exposure: Pecker, National Enquirer editor-in-chief Dylan Howard and Trump Organization Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg.

    Weisselberg is one of Trump’s closest financial advisers and was named to run The Donald J. Trump Revocable Trust ― which owns the Trump Organization and all other business entities connected to Trump ― with Trump’s two eldest sons when Trump assumed the presidency. Pecker is believed to have purchased numerous unflattering stories about Trump over the years to prevent their disclosure.

    It is not presently clear whether the immunity deals for Pecker and Weisselberg extend beyond simply affirming the facts of the felony crimes that Cohen admitted to in court. Even if they solely back up those facts, their testimony would provide a further basis to believe that Trump was involved in those felony campaign finance violations.

    Cohen’s plea deal also contains allegations that he was in contact with members of Trump’s presidential campaign about the payments. The identity of these campaign staffers is not yet publicly known.

    New York Attorney General Investigates Trump Foundation, Trump Campaign and Cohen For Campaign Finance Laws, Fraud
    On June 14, New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood filed a criminal lawsuit against the Donald J. Trump Foundation alleging the charitable nonprofit engaged in a pattern of illegal activity including self-dealing to personally benefit Trump and illegal coordination with Trump’s presidential campaign. The suit comes after a two-year investigation into the operations of the foundation. The lawsuit seeks to dissolve the foundation, ban Trump from serving on any nonprofit boards for 10 years and his three children who served on the foundation’s board, Don, Jr., Ivanka and Eric, from serving on nonprofit boards for one year each, and restitution of $2.8 million and additional penalties.

    [​IMG]
    HuffPost Illustration/Getty Images
    New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood.
    “As our investigation reveals, the Trump Foundation was little more than a checkbook for payments from Mr. Trump or his businesses to nonprofits, regardless of their purpose or legality,” Underwood said in a statement when the suit was filed.

    Trump’s one-time campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, directed payments from the foundation to benefit Trump’s campaign in the Iowa caucus in 2016, according to the lawsuit. Trump used the foundation to purchase a self-portrait to hang at one of his golf courses. He also used the foundation’s money to settle legal claims made against his properties.

    Underwood’s office is undertaking this investigation in coordination with the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance. The department on Wednesday subpoenaed Cohen to turn over documents and testify about the foundation’s finances.

    NYAG Underwood and New York State Department of Taxation and Finance Investigates Michael Cohen For Tax Fraud
    In addition to her investigation into the Trump Foundation, Underwood sought a criminal referral from the Department of Taxation and Finance to pursue a criminal investigation into Cohen for breaking state tax laws. This presents another opportunity for prosecutors to pry into Trump’s finances through his former personal fixer and lawyer.

    Maryland Attorney General And District of Columbia Attorney General Sue Trump For Emoluments Clause Violation
    Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh and District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine sued Trump and his company alleging that his ownership of a hotel in D.C. puts the president in direct violation of the Constitution’s Emoluments Clause. This clause forbids government officials, including the president, from receiving payments, gifts or benefits from foreign governments and national and state government entities. It was enacted to specifically insulate the federal government from corruption by foreign governments and from any individual U.S. state government.

    [​IMG]
    HuffPost Illustration/Getty Images
    Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C.
    Trump could be in violation of the clause as his Trump International Hotel in D.C. occupies the Old Post Office building, a structure owned by the federal government and leased to Trump’s business. In addition, the hotel has received payments from foreign governments seeking to influence the president’s policies.

    While technically not a criminal investigation, the lawsuit will result in the disclosure of important documents showing how foreign governments are using Trump’s properties to gain influence in his administration. It could ultimately result in forcing the president to divest from his business or the federal government to cancel its lease with the Trump Organization to operate the D.C. hotel, lest they are in violation of the Constitution.

    A federal judge ruled on July 25 that the Emoluments Clause applies to the Office of the President and that the payments and benefits Trump receives through his hotel from foreign and domestic governments could very well be a violation of the clause ― and therefore the Constitution. Frosh and Racine were able to demand the Trump Organization hand over documents related to foreign government payments to the company in the wake of the decision.

    Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Potential Investigation Into Trump Organization For Fraud
    Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance is considering pursuing criminal charges against the Trump Organization and two company officials for the reimbursement to Cohen, according to The New York Times.

    This appears to be an opening salvo by New York state prosecutors into investigating the many potential criminal violations of the president’s business.

    There have been many allegations of money laundering through his company over the years. Reporters have raised questions about the large number of wealthy foreigners, particularly from Russia and former Soviet states, who have purchased real estate in his properties. (U.S. real estate is a favorite money laundering location for the global rich as it is easy to invest in anonymously.)

    No one knows where Trump got the money to fund the purchase of his Scottish golf course. The Trump Organization may have laundered money from the Iranian Revolutionary Guard in its failed bid to build a Trump Tower in Baku, Azerbaijan, Adam Davidson reported in The New Yorker. The Azerbaijan deal was dropped along with separate deals in Georgia and Brazil during the time after Trump was elected but before he took office. The president’s partners in Brazil had fallen under investigation for corruption while the deals in Azerbaijan and Georgia would not withstand any extended media scrutiny.

    [​IMG]
    HuffPost Illustration/Getty Images
    Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance
    The worst may be yet to come for Trump. Zephyr Teachout, a candidate for the Democratic nomination to be the next New York attorney general, has made a promise to fully investigate Trump’s business the central thrust of her candidacy. “Donald Trump’s businesses are here,” Teachout told The Atlantic in August. “What the New York attorney general can do, and as attorney general I’ll make a priority, is investigating those businesses. That power extends to, in the case of extreme illegality, dissolving businesses.”

    Democrats also have compiled a massive list of subpoenas targeting the Trump administration and the Trump Organization they hope to file if they win control of the House of Representatives in November.

    The number of investigations and lawsuits targeting the president could easily ― and quickly ― metastasize to more than six.
     
  11. ccc

    ccc 难得糊涂 ID:6614 管理成员 VIP

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    One more ....

    upload_2018-9-3_13-20-20.png

    Washington (CNN) Washington lobbyist W. Samuel Patten pleaded guilty Friday to acting as an unregistered foreign lobbyist, and admitted to lying to the Senate Intelligence Committee and funneling a Ukrainian oligarch's money to Donald Trump's Presidential Inaugural Committee.

    Patten's plea and cooperation agreement is connected to special counsel Robert Mueller's ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the election and coordination with the Trump campaign -- even apparently reaching into former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort's inner circle in Ukraine.

    This is the first time the Justice Department has publicly charged a person for helping a foreigner secretly funnel money into a Trump political event. Under his deal with prosecutors, Patten is charged only with one criminal count. He faces a maximum of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine for the felony charge. A sentencing date has not been set.

    Patten sought tickets to Trump's inauguration on behalf of an unnamed prominent Ukrainian oligarch, according to court documents released Friday, ultimately paying $50,000 for four tickets. Patten used another American as a "straw purchaser," funneling the Ukrainian's money secretly to the inaugural committee through a Cypriot bank account.

    "Patten was aware at the time that the Presidential Inauguration Committee could not accept money from foreign nationals," prosecutors wrote in the filing.

    Rudy Giuliani, the President's lawyer, told reporters Friday Patten's case had nothing to do with his client.

    "It turned about to be this irrelevant indictment, where I think Mueller has turned out to be a private prosecutor," Giuliani said. "What does this have to do with President Trump? Not a single thing. It has nothing to do with collusion, some guy who donated to the inauguration? My goodness,they had 500,000 people donate to the inauguration -- every time they get a speeding ticket is Mueller going to do it?"

    CNN previously reported that Russian oligarchs have also been questioned about donations to the Trump campaign and inauguration.

    Guilty for Lobbying
    Overall, Patten, 47, was paid more than $1 million for his Ukrainian opposition bloc work including meeting with members of the executive branch, Senate Foreign Relations Committee members and members of Congress, according to a charging document filed in the US District Court for the District of Columbia on Friday. He also worked with an unnamed Russian -- believed to be former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort's close associate Konstantin Kilimnik -- to place op-ed articles in US media in 2017, the Justice Department says.

    The plea deal was handled by the DC US Attorney's Office and the Justice Department's National Security Division, not Mueller's team, which is about to take former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort to trial on a similar charge.

    The criminal charging document does not name Manafort or any of his colleagues in the US and Ukraine, though Patten's efforts from 2014 on may be connected to those efforts.

    Kilimnik, a Russian national with ties to the Russian military intelligence group accused of interfering in the presidential election, has close professional ties to both Patten and Manafort as they worked for the same Ukrainian political interests.

    Kilimnik was among the alleged co-conspirators that helped Manafort hide his Ukrainian consulting income in foreign bank accounts, according to documents revealed at Manafort's trial for financial crimes earlier this month. Mueller's prosecutors charged Kilimnik and Manafort in June in a separate federal court with witness tampering, after Kilimnik reached out to potential witnesses in Manafort foreign lobbying case. Kilimnik has not entered a plea in his case, because he is living in Moscow, prosecutors say. Manafort has pleaded not guilty to the foreign lobbying charges, and those criminal allegations do not reach past 2015.

    Kilimnik co-ran a company with Patten, called Begemot Ventures International, according to business records. According to the court filing in the Patten case Friday, Patten and Foreigner A "formed a company in the United States and were 50-50 partners. Beginning in or around 2015, Company A, among other things, advised the Opposition Bloc and members of that part."

    As part of his plea, Patten agreed to cooperate with both Mueller's office and prosecutors from the DC US Attorney's Office going forward, including turning over documents and testifying at future grand jury hearings or criminal trials.

    Lying to Congress
    Patten admitted to lying to the US Senate Intelligence Committee in January this year about the inauguration tickets. While testifying, he attempted to hide his connections to the Ukrainian oligarch and the Russian national with whom he worked, prosecutors said.

    Patten "intentionally did not provide" the committee documents related to the Ukrainian oligarch's purchase of four Trump inaugural tickets and lied to the Senate Committee about his foreign lobbying work. He also deleted documents "pertinent to his relationships" with the foreign political interests, according to the Justice Department prosecutors.

    Senate intelligence Chairman Richard Burr and Vice Chairman Mark Warner said they referred Patten to the Justice Department.

    "We can confirm that Mr. Patten produced documents to the Committee and was interviewed by Committee staff," the senators said in a statement. "Due to concerns about certain statements made by Mr. Patten, the Committee made a criminal referral to the Department of Justice. While the charge, and resultant plea, do not appear to directly involve our referral, we appreciate their review of this matter."

    Court appearance
    Patten appeared in court Friday morning before Judge Amy Berman Jackson, the same judge who is handling Manafort's trial that is scheduled to begin next month.

    In court, Patten conveyed the air of a solemn man aware of what he had done.

    As Berman Jackson asked him several questions about his willfulness to plead guilty and the rights he will waive, Patten answered her slowly and clearly each time: "Yes, your honor," "I understand, your honor," "I do, your honor."

    In a blue shirt and navy suit and tie, the lifelong Washingtonian stood before the judge, nodding often as she spoke to him.
    Patten only appeared to stumble in his speech when asked for his plea.

    "I would -- I plead guilty to the charge," Patten said to the judge.

    Berman Jackson confirmed that he had signed every page of his plea agreement and charging documents with "a squiggle."

    A prosecutor from the DC US Attorney's Office read the charging document made public Friday before the hearing, almost word for word. He added no new details when describing Patten's criminal offense, though he added the words more than once that Patten "was working as a foreign agent of the Opposition Bloc."

    The Ukrainian political party, called the Opposition Bloc, had deep ties to Russia in the period in which Patten represented them, including many allies of the former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych. The political party formed from the remnants of Yanukovych's base after he was driven out of Ukraine in 2014 and fled to Russia.

    Patten's defense attorney declined to comment following the hearing.

    The 35-minute court proceeding was sparsely attended by members of the press and court employees, yet members of Mueller's special counsel's office filled a front row of seats. They were lead Manafort prosecutor Andrew Weissmann and FBI agents Omer Meisel and Brock Domin.

    After the hearing ended, Weissmann spent several minutes greeting Patten's defense attorney, Stuart Sears, and two prosecutors from other Justice Department offices on the case. Patten stood waiting with his hands crossed in front of him without a smile, and he shook Meisel's hand.

    Spokesmen from the special counsel's office and DC US Attorney's Office declined to comment further about the case.

    Patten will not be detained until his sentencing. But he will need to give up his passport and must ask the judge for permission to travel outside the Washington metro area. He also must continue to see a psychiatrist or therapist, which he said he currently does regularly for depression and anxiety treatment, and he must avoid alcohol, the judge ordered.

    Berman Jackson also spoke on the rarity of a foreign lobbying prosecution. There is no sentencing guideline for this type of case and no analogous guidelines the court can use to determine Patten's sentence.

    "That's a little complicated," Berman Jackson said when discussing his potential sentence. "I don't usually have to go into all that."

    The prosecutors and defense will give the court a status update in 60 days on Patten's case.
     
    已获得Teddy的支持。
  12. 向问天

    向问天 日月神教光明左使 ID:112302 VIP

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    身边一伙罪犯,川普太不容易了。
     
  13. Anakin

    Anakin 本站元老 ID:2325 VIP

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    律师知法犯法要不要罪加一等?
     
  14. Anakin

    Anakin 本站元老 ID:2325 VIP

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    和胡总书记有得一比
     
  15. ccc

    ccc 难得糊涂 ID:6614 管理成员 VIP

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    阉了他们。
     

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