Mankind vs Peoplekind,希尔翩翩总理风!

focus on today

资深人士
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  • Max的政策对加拿大人来说不错,除非有人故意曲解他的政策,只可惜他拉杆子太晚了,估计Scheer的政策跟Max的大方向一致,只不过没那么blunt,毕竟Scheer影响大一些,还得政治正确一下。Max知道他这次希望不大,所以也没什么顾忌
    这个分析有理。
     

    New Person

    本站元老
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    2003-08-26
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    宽容、和平、平等、尊重、自由 ...... 历来就是右派价值。
    Al-Soufi family speaks out as community rallies to reopen restaurant despite online threats
    The Syrian owners of a Toronto restaurant they closed after receiving death threats are holding a news conference Thursday morning, a day after the family announced its intention to reopen the business.

    Husam and Shahnaz Al-Soufi are speaking at Soufi's downtown eatery on Queen Street West. They're being joined by Mohamad Fakih, CEO of Paramount Foods, who is helping the family resume business despite what he calls "intimidation and hate."

    You can watch their remarks live starting at 10:30 a.m. ET.

    The Al-Soufi family said it started receiving the threats — which Toronto police are set to investigate — after their eldest son protested outside a September event in Hamilton featuring People's Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier.

    The event became the source of controversy when people protesting Bernier's presence were seen physically blocking and verbally abusing Dorothy Marston, a senior trying to enter the venue.

    The Al-Soufis confirmed in a statement that their son, Alaa, was at the protest to stand up against oppression, but also regrets what happened to Marston.

    "That said, he did not in any way verbally or physically assault the elderly woman, and has nonetheless offered to apologize personally for not doing more," the statement said.

    Despite the family's appeals, it received numerous violent and racist online threats. Those threats, they said, potentially put them, their staff and patrons in danger, and therefore they had no choice but to close.

    Fakih, whose Paramount Foods shops have popped up across the GTA, has had his own run-ins with online hatred.

    Last May, he won a $2.5-million lawsuit against a former Mississauga, Ont., mayoral candidate who made, as the judge described, "hateful Islamophobic" comments against him in an online video.
     
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