Nature: 为什么<自然>支持乔·拜登担任美国总统

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EDITORIAL 14 OCTOBER 2020

Why Nature supports Joe Biden for US president
We cannot stand by and let science be undermined. Joe Biden’s trust in truth, evidence, science and democracy make him the only choice in the US election.

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Joe Biden speaks to Union members

Joe Biden must be given an opportunity to heal a divided nation and begin the urgent task of rebuilding the United States’ reputation in the world.Credit: Roberto Schmidt/AFP/Getty

On 9 November 2016, the world awoke to an unexpected result: Donald Trump had been elected president of the United States.

This journal did not hide its disappointment. But, Nature observed, US democracy was designed with safeguards intended to protect against excesses. It is founded on a system of checks and balances that makes it difficult for a president to exercise absolute power. We were hopeful that this would help to curb the damage that might result from Trump’s disregard for evidence and the truth, disrespect for those he disagrees with and toxic attitude towards women.

How wrong we turned out to be.

No US president in recent history has so relentlessly attacked and undermined so many valuable institutions, from science agencies to the media, the courts, the Department of Justice — and even the electoral system. Trump claims to put ‘America First’. But in his response to the pandemic, Trump has put himself first, not America.

His administration has picked fights with the country’s long-standing friends and allies, and walked away from crucial international scientific and environmental agreements and organizations: notably, the 2015 Paris climate accord; the Iran nuclear deal; the United Nations’ science and education agency UNESCO; and even, unthinkable in the middle of a pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO).



Why Nature needs to cover politics now more than ever

Challenges such as ending the COVID-19 pandemic, tackling global warming and halting the proliferation and threat of nuclear weapons are global, and urgent. They will not be overcome without the collective efforts of the nation states and international institutions that the Trump administration has sought to undermine.

On the domestic front, one of this administration’s most dangerous legacies will be its shameful record of interference in health and science agencies — thus undermining public trust in the very institutions that are essential to keeping people safe.

Joe Biden, Trump’s opponent in next month’s presidential election, is the nation’s best hope to begin to repair this damage to science and the truth — by virtue of his policies and his leadership record in office, as a former vice-president and as a senator.

Four years ago, some hoped that Trump’s excesses would be reined in by his conservative Republican party, which has long valued the rule of law. Previous Republican presidents have also ascribed to a bipartisan tradition of supporting funding for science and innovation. But Trump has sought to remake the Republican party according to his own populist values.

Populists, from all points on the political compass, are on the rise around the world. They divide the world into ‘people’ and ‘elites’. The latter, according to populists, include researchers and the institutions where they work. The Trump administration has undermined trust in their knowledge, interfered with their autonomy, and expressed disdain for the essential role they have in national life. Supreme Court justices, civil-service professionals and journalists have been similarly attacked.

Coronavirus catastrophe

The Trump administration’s disregard for rules, government, science, institutions of democracy and, ultimately, facts and the truth have been on full display in its disastrous response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In the pandemic’s earliest days, Trump chose not to craft a comprehensive national strategy to increase testing and contact tracing, and to bolster public-health facilities. Instead, he flouted and publicly derided the science-based health guidelines set by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for the use of face masks and social distancing.



What a Joe Biden presidency would mean for five key science issues

The administration later rewrote guidelines when the message did not align with its agenda. Trump has lied about the dangers posed by the virus and has encouraged people to protest against policies intended to slow its transmission. The result, if not the goal, has been to downplay the greatest crisis the country — and the world — has faced in at least half a century.

These actions have had devastating consequences. With the nation’s death toll now exceeding 215,000, the coronavirus has killed more people in the United States than anywhere else. Even adjusting for population size, the country has fared spectacularly badly. Despite having vast scientific and monetary resources at his disposal, Trump failed catastrophically when it mattered most.

This undermining of research advice has been accompanied by the systematic dismantling of scientific capacity in regulatory science agencies.

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which was created 50 years ago under a Republican president, Richard Nixon, has helped many nations to better understand the dangers of pollution, and has pioneered regulations that have cleaned up the environment and saved millions of lives. But under the Trump administration, the EPA has withered as its scientists have been ignored by the senior leadership. Those at the top of the agency have worked to roll back or weaken more than 80 rules and regulations controlling a spectrum of pollutants, from greenhouse gases to mercury and sulfur dioxide.

Likewise, the CDC, which should have led the coronavirus response, was quickly made subordinate to a task force whose leaders include vice-president Mike Pence and Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner — neither of whom has expertise in infectious diseases. Then, in July, the administration took away the CDC’s responsibility for coronavirus data collection, management and sharing, and handed this to the Department of Health and Human Services — the CDC’s parent institution, whose head, Alex Azar, is answerable to the president.
No president in recent history has tried to politicize government agencies and purge them of scientific expertise on the scale undertaken by this one. The Trump administration’s actions are accelerating climate change, razing wilderness, fouling air and killing more wildlife — as well as people.



How Trump damaged science — and why it could take decades to recover

Trump has also promoted nationalism, isolationism and xenophobia — including tacitly supporting white-supremacist groups. The administration has rewritten immigration policies, beginning in 2017 with a controversial travel ban on people from seven countries, including five Muslim-majority states. Even now, with the election weeks away, the Department of Homeland Security is proposing to limit the length of visas for international students.

The United States’ reputation as an open and welcoming country to the world’s students and researchers has suffered. International talent has clearly played a crucial part in helping the country to become a research and innovation powerhouse. Trump’s efforts to close borders, limit immigration and discourage international scientific cooperation — especially with researchers from China — are precisely the opposite of what is needed if the world is to succeed in tackling the mounting global challenges before us.

Biden must lead

Trump has not grown into his position as president, and has demonstrated that he can neither lead nor unite the United States.

Joe Biden, by contrast, has a history in the Senate as a politician who has reached across to his political opponents and worked with them to achieve bipartisan support for legislation — a skill that will be needed now more than at any time in the recent past, because he will inherit a nation that is even more divided than it was four years ago.

He has shown that he respects the values of research, and has vowed to work to restore the United States’ fractured global relationships. For these reasons, Nature is endorsing Biden and urging voters to cast a ballot for him on 3 November.

Biden’s campaign has worked closely with researchers to develop comprehensive plans on COVID-19 and climate change. He has pledged that decisions on the pandemic response will be made by public-health professionals and not by politicians; and he is rightly committing to restoring the ability of these professionals to communicate directly with the public.



Tired of science being ignored? Get political

In addition, Biden is promising to ramp up test-and-trace programmes and to provide more support for people hit hardest by the coronavirus. Combined with vaccines and medicines, these are the kinds of policies that will be essential to ending the pandemic.

On climate change, Biden would return the United States to the Paris agreement, and is proposing the most ambitious domestic climate policies ever advocated by nominees from the country’s major parties. A US$2-trillion plan would invest in clean energy and low-carbon infrastructure, with the ambition of weaning the United States off fossil-fuel-generated electricity by 2035.

If elected, Biden would have the chance to reinstate and strengthen the climate and environmental regulations rolled back under Trump; restore the EPA’s depleted scientific capacity; and return the CDC’s leadership role in the pandemic. He should also move to reverse egregious policies on immigration and student visas, and hold the United States to its international commitments — not least its membership of the WHO and UNESCO.

Donald Trump has taken an axe to a system that was intended to safeguard and protect citizens when leaders go astray. He has become an icon for those who seek to sow hatred and division, not only in the United States, but in other countries, too.

Joe Biden must be given an opportunity to restore trust in truth, in evidence, in science and in other institutions of democracy, heal a divided nation, and begin the urgent task of rebuilding the United States’ reputation in the world.

Nature 586, 335 (2020)
doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-020-02852-x
 

billwanhua

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Either USA has a problem or the science community has given both Nature and NEJM speak politically
 

gocanoeing

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呵呵,民主党够牛B的,把科学杂志都逼出来表态!:evil:
类似其实美国选举和我没什么关系,不过我就是觉得床总这个老流氓不适合当美国总统
 

RareEarth

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民主党和拜登都没那么大本事,是川不靠谱让很多人吃不消了。
 

livingeverywhere

一直在被删帖,还被不停的各种限制发言,哈哈,等CFC被联邦调查就好玩了嘛,坐实了中共狗腿的名
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自然杂志这是在自杀吗?

怪不得不刊登有关新冠病毒是人造的这个观点的文章
 

阿土仔

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类似其实美国选举和我没什么关系,不过我就是觉得床总这个老流氓不适合当美国总统
呵呵,那个吃里扒外的白等适合当总统?看着玩吧,越来越精彩了。
 

阿土仔

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民主党和拜登都没那么大本事,是川不靠谱让很多人吃不消了。
送交FBI的爆料都能扣那么久,叫几个科学老朽出来站台还不信手拈来?:evil:
 

lindamy

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Showing 1–50 of 2592 results

  1. Editorial | 14 October 2020
    Why Nature supports Joe Biden for US president
    Nature 586 , 335–335
    Rights & permissionsfor article Why <i>Nature</i> supports Joe Biden for US president . Opens in a new window.
  2. News | 14 October 2020
    US biomedical and medical research under the Trump administration
    • ...research under US President Donald Trump’s administration.
    • Paul Webster
    Nature Medicine
    Rights & permissionsfor article US biomedical and medical research under the Trump administration . Opens in a new window.

  3. Comments and Opinion | 13 October 2020
    Tired of science being ignored? Get politicalNature 586 , 337–337
    Rights & permissionsfor article Tired of science being ignored? Get political . Opens in a new window.

  4. News | 8 October 2020
    Science under Trump: Four key moments
    • What Trump’s first term has meant...
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  5. News | 7 October 2020
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  6. News | 6 October 2020
    Contact tracing Trump’s travels would be ‘massive but feasible’Nature 586 , 350–350
    Rights & permissionsfor article Contact tracing Trump’s travels would be ‘massive but feasible’ . Opens in a new window.

  7. Editorial | 6 October 2020
    Why Nature needs to cover politics now more than ever
    Nature 586 , 169–170
    Rights & permissionsfor article Why <i>Nature</i> needs to cover politics now more than ever . Opens in a new window.

  8. News | 5 October 2020
    How Trump damaged science — and why it could take decades to recoverNature 586 , 190–194
    Rights & permissionsfor article How Trump damaged science — and why it could take decades to recover . Opens in a new window.
  9. News | 5 October 2020
    A four-year timeline of Trump’s impact on science
    • ...coronavirus pandemic, US President Donald Trump’s policies and actions have...
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    Rights & permissionsfor article A four-year timeline of Trump’s impact on science . Opens in a new window.

  10. News | 2 October 2020
    Daily briefing: US President Donald Trump has tested positive for the coronavirusNature
    Rights & permissionsfor article Daily briefing: US President Donald Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus . Opens in a new window.

  11. News | 1 October 2020
    What a Joe Biden presidency would mean for five key science issuesNature 586 , 177–180
    Rights & permissionsfor article What a Joe Biden presidency would mean for five key science issues . Opens in a new window.

  12. Editorial | 29 September 2020
    Vote, for science!
    Nature Methods 17 , 949–949
    Rights & permissionsfor article Vote, for science! . Opens in a new window.
  13. Books and Arts | 29 September 2020
    Democracy suffers when government statistics failNature 586 , 27–28
    Rights & permissionsfor article Democracy suffers when government statistics fail . Opens in a new window.
  14. Editorial | 29 September 2020
    COVID vaccine confidence requires radical transparency
    Nature 586 , 8–8
    Rights & permissionsfor article COVID vaccine confidence requires radical transparency . Opens in a new window.

  15. News | 28 September 2020
    What Trump’s Supreme Court pick could mean for scienceNature 586 , 183–184
    Rights & permissionsfor article What Trump’s Supreme Court pick could mean for science . Opens in a new window.
  16. Comments and Opinion | 28 September 2020
    The visa woes that shattered scientists’ American dreams
    • ...turbulent year triggered by the Trump administration’s visa restrictions.
    • Virginia Gewin
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    Rights & permissionsfor article The visa woes that shattered scientists’ American dreams . Opens in a new window.
  17. News | 25 September 2020
    COVID-vaccine results are on the way — and scientists’ concerns are growingNature 586 , 16–17
    Rights & permissionsfor article COVID-vaccine results are on the way — and scientists’ concerns are growing . Opens in a new window.
  18. Editorial | 24 September 2020
    Trumping science
    • ...is under attack from the Trump administration. Agency senior executives...
    Nature Biotechnology 38 , 1105–1105
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lindamy

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呵呵,民主党够牛B的,把科学杂志都逼出来表态!:evil:
最好不要总是认为很多观点不同的意见都是被谁逼出来的,或者收买的。

此文的第一句话:

On 9 November 2016, the world awoke to an unexpected result: Donald Trump had been elected president of the United States.

This journal did not hide its disappointment.
 

billwanhua

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最好不要总是认为很多观点不同的意见都是被谁逼出来的,或者收买的。

此文的第一句话:

On 9 November 2016, the world awoke to an unexpected result: Donald Trump had been elected president of the United States.

This journal did not hide its disappointment.
说被收卖或者假新闻是最省事的方法,问题是会带来其它更大的伤害,整个科学界或者新闻媒体都腐败,这个对整个体制的伤害恰恰是Nature和NEMJ站出来的原因
 

阿土仔

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最好不要总是认为很多观点不同的意见都是被谁逼出来的,或者收买的。

此文的第一句话:

On 9 November 2016, the world awoke to an unexpected result: Donald Trump had been elected president of the United States.

This journal did not hide its disappointment.
这句话隐含了两个意思:
1. 科学杂志政治化。这是不恰当的,对读者也不公平。就像本地的数学老师试图把自己的政治观点强加给不暗世事的学生。
2. 民主党舆论导向左右了世界,但严重背离了美国主流民意,导致大选最后“一翻两瞪眼儿”。

不知道我落了什么没有,你可以补充。

多说一句,那话说出来显示主编吃果果地缺心眼儿......:evil:
 
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臭农民

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科学杂志出完全政治化的文章非常不专业,把工作和生活还有自己的个人政治观点混在一起然后打包发给别人,也不知道在想什么?
按这逻辑以后法官根据自己政治倾向,对人种的喜好来进行判案都是可以的了
人事部门招人也可以毫无顾忌的进行操作了
 

lindamy

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每个人都可以有自己的看法,认为这个人对,那个人不对,自然,柳叶刀,细胞等顶级科学杂志,该不该参与政治,为什么做这些“不专业”的事,恐怕也是显而易见,但是解读不同而已。
 

billwanhua

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科学杂志出完全政治化的文章非常不专业,把工作和生活还有自己的个人政治观点混在一起然后打包发给别人,也不知道在想什么?
按这逻辑以后法官根据自己政治倾向,对人种的喜好来进行判案都是可以的了
人事部门招人也可以毫无顾忌的进行操作了
你觉得美国法官没有政治倾向?为什么川普跟共和党要搞大法官提名?最高法院大法官都有政治倾向,都根据自己政治理解来解释宪法。
媒体当然有政治倾向,要不然所有媒体报道就应该像罗胖解释的那样,时间地点什么事几句话的报道,每天报纸一张A4 纸。当然政治倾向有个度,不能把黑的说成白的,但是很多都有解释的空间。
 
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